29 Jun 2013 | The Gazette | MEGAN MARTIN | SPECIAL TO THE GAZETTE

Located slightly northwest of Montreal’s downtown centre, the city of Côte-St-Luc is bordered by the town of Hampstead, the borough of Notre Dame-de-Grâce, and the town of Montreal West. The cozy community covers approximately seven square kilometres and is home to 32,500 residents.

In addition to shops, the Cavendish Mall includes a food court, multiplex movie theatre and walk-in clinic. Photo: The Gazette.

In addition to shops, the Cavendish Mall includes a food court, multiplex movie theatre and walk-in clinic. Photo: The Gazette.

It was established as a town in 1903 and officially became a city in 1958. Today, it is the third-largest municipality on the island of Montreal, one that many families and professionals call home.

“We have a beautiful residential community that has great local businesses and offers excellent and high-quality bilingual services from the municipality,” said Anthony Housefather, mayor of Côte-St-Luc.

“Even though we’re a large city, we’re like a small town where everyone cares about one another and the spirit of volunteerism pervades.”

Côte-St-Luc features many community services, benefiting all residents. Among them are a library, a new aquatic and community centre that has become a popular hub in the city, 28 parks, an arena, baseball diamonds and soccer fields, and great cultural and sports programs for people of all ages.

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The Gazette

“We have made efforts … to bring in more young singles and young families, and we have been very successful.”
Anthony Housefather

“We also have our own dramatic society that just completed a 16-show production of Fiddler on the Roof which was seen by more than 3,000 people,” Housefather said.

Safety innovation has been an important issue for Côte-St-Luc in recent years. In fact, the city was the first in Quebec to pass a bylaw requiring bike helmets.

“We were also the first city in the province to ban smoking in public buildings,” Mayor Housefather said. “And we’re the only city on the island with our own volunteer Emergency Medical Services — and our Volunteer Citizens on Patrol (VCOPS) has close to 100 volunteers.”

Residential developments that attract young buyers help rejuvenate the city

The city has also made an effort to improve its environmental impact and create a healthy community for residents.

“We were the first city on the island to introduce residential composting and we recently unveiled an urban agriculture and food plan,” he noted.

“We always look to the world to see what cities are doing and we make a point not to adopt a parochial approach to things.”

Although Côte-St-Luc is a well-established residential city and isn’t incurring the impact of gentrification like other areas of the island, the demographic of residents has grown younger in recent years.

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The Gazette

During a break from the rain on June 25, 2013, a couple of ducks eye the waters of Centennial Lake in Cote-St-Luc’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau Park. Photo: The Gazette

During a break from the rain on June 25, 2013, a couple of ducks eye the waters of Centennial Lake in Cote-St-Luc’s Pierre Elliott Trudeau Park. Photo: The Gazette

“We have made efforts since I have been mayor to rejuvenate the city and bring in more young singles and young families, and we have been very successful,” Housefather added.

“The median age here has gone down from 51 years old in 2001 to 46 years old in the most recent census, and more and more young families are moving in as our new housing stock is geared toward townhouses.”

A handful of residential developments have gone up to accommodate the influx of residents. For instance, Les Cours Marc Chagall, a townhouse development on Marc Chagall Ave., features 21 townhouses starting at $485,000. The development was extremely well received by buyers and had already sold out at the time of this writing.

City council also recently approved the first reading of a bylaw for a new townhouse project of 50 units on Parkhaven Ave.

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The Gazette

Photo: The gazette

Photo: The gazette

“We are also in the middle of a large project where the Cavendish Mall has sold off a portion of its land so that townhouse projects and single-family homes can be built,” Housefather said. “When the project is complete, three new streets will have been created, including ‘The Avenue’ which we hope will turn into the Monkland Ave. of Côte-St-Luc.”

The mayor said he’s proud of the developments currently taking place in Côte-St-Luc.

“This is already a wonderful community with many programs offered by the city, great public and private schools, friendly neighbours and a city that is getting younger all the time,” he said. “The population here is diverse and people of all backgrounds are welcomed with open arms.

“I think we’re defined by our values of bilingualism, respect for human rights, multiculturalism and pride in being Canadian.”

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