There have been reports of coyote sightings in Côte Saint-Luc. The recent sighting (October 2016) was behind homes on Holland, near the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks.

Typically, coyotes are present along the gullies next to railroad tracks. In fact, CP has a program in place to trap coyotes, but it only starts on October 25, which is when hunting season opens in Quebec.

Urban coyotes do not feast on pets and garbage; they typically stick to a natural diet.

Due to sensationalist reporting, many urban residents think all coyotes are out to eat their dog or cat at the first opportunity or that they’re dumpster divers of the first degree. On the contrary, studies have shown that urban coyotes stick mainly to a natural diet.

According to wildlife experts, there are things people can do to discourage coyotes from entering back yards or private property.

Discourage coyotes from entering your property by removing brush piles or areas that may be perceived as a resting place or den.

Don’t feed coyotes. Ensure garbage, bird feed, and pet food is inaccessible. Avoid leaving food from fruit trees on the ground.

Keep pets attended and on leash. Supervise animals when they are in the yard. Cats should not be permitted to roam freely.
Do not turn your back on, or run from, a coyote. Stand tall, wave your arms and make lots of noise.

Trapping and killing or relocating urban coyotes does not reduce the overall population of coyotes.

A common reaction from urban and suburban residents when they learn coyotes are living in their areas is to ask for the removal of the coyotes, either through lethal means or by trapping and relocating them. However, animal control officers have learned through a lot of experience that this in NOT only a lot harder to do than it sounds, but does nothing to reduce the number of coyotes living in an area. In fact, it has the opposite effect.

Watch this video from the Town of Oakville for more useful information showing how to scare coyotes away from your property.

 

 

For more information visit the CSL website.

N

More:

CTV News