I’m tired of falling back!

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Worth Repeating:

garfield_i_hate_mornings

It’s about time!

Really, it’s about time that we ended this ridiculous 1970s-oil-crisis-game show of turning the clocks back and forth and pretending that this outdated and disruptive ritual is somehow beneficial to the economy or environment or our circadian rhythm. It’s not. I’m sick and tired of falling back!

Studies have shown that traffic accidents spike because we’re thrown off kilter, that heart attacks rates increase and that unless we’re raising chickens in our backyards that there’s not much of a benefit of having the sun come up well before 99% of us are ready to lift our weary heads off of our pillows. In fact, I don’t know anyone that is all that thrilled of having the sun set over Mount Royal at 3:30PM, a good hour before anyone’s even contemplating leaving their office (two hours for the rest of us).

I hate driving home before dinner in pitch black, yawning my way down Fleet Road, ready for my pajamas and fluffy slippers, only to remember that there are kids’ activities to drive to or volunteer work or meetings to attend.

And, I don’t know about you but why do I need the sun to rise at 6:00AM, especially in the middle of winter when the likelihood of going for an early morning jog in -30C on ice covered sidewalks is kinda low on my list of favourite pastimes.

So, this is a message to my favourite Member of Parliament. I know you’re reading this Anthony. You’re the only person I know that will be getting up super early to swim 100 laps before I hear Snap, Crackle or Pop. Please march right over to Justin’s office and deposit a draft bill to repeal the time change, just like those wise Saskatchewanians who were smart enough to realize that it’s better to stay on Daylight Savings Time, all the time!

If you’re like me, you too are sick and tired of falling back!

N

Here’s my previous rant on this annoying subject.

And this is a clipping from the Suburban Newspaper back in 2012:

Suburban Newspaper, Jan. 4, 2012

Suburban Newspaper, Jan. 4, 2012

 

 

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Our farmer is closer than you’d think

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Judy Hagshi and Jeremy Nashen at Lufa Farms rooftop nursery near Marché Central

Lufa Farms is an agricultural company located in the Ahuntsic-Cartierville neighborhood of Montreal. It is reputed to have built the world’s first commercial greenhouse on the roof of a building. The company’s first Montreal greenhouse began operations in early 2011.

Covering an area of 31,000 square feet, Lufa Farms produces vegetables year-round without synthetic pesticides, capturing rainwater, and recirculating irrigation water. The company delivers more than 10,000 baskets per week.

Lufa Farms rooftop nursery grows a wide variety of produce capturing and recycling rainwater and irrigating the plants through drip technology

Lufa Farms’ relies on a direct-to consumer business model, which minimizes the transport of food. Unlike traditional greenhouses, Lufa Farms recreates several microclimates to provide the quality and productivity of cultivars. According to the founder of Lufa Farms, Mohamed Hage, “If we were using the roofs of 19 shopping centres in Montreal, we could make the city self-sufficient.”

My family signed up to receive a weekly basket of fruit and vegetables four years ago through the Cote Saint-Luc Public Library. After a pause of a few years, my wife Judy, decided to rejoin a few weeks ago. Lufa Farms’ members are called “Lufavors”.

The happy Lufavors: Phyllis, Glenn, Nicole, Nathalie, Jeremy and Judy

We attended yesterday’s open house in their rooftop nursery near the Marché Central. My family took part in the study tour learning all about their operations and distribution system. Did you know that your average fruit and vegetable travels 2500 kilometres until it gets to you. The produce is cultivated long before you consume it and is transferred via refrigerated trucking, stored in refrigerated warehouses and is redistributed to your grocer before you ever see it on their shelves. By comparison, Lufa Farms picks your personalized order from the vine overnight and it’s generally in your kitchen within 12 hours!

Big, fresh and delicious

 

From vine to your kitchen in 12 hours!

An vibrant micro-economy has sprung out of this venture with small artisan producers partnering with Lufa to bring their products directly to its member’s table through the Lufa distribution network.

My wife and kids select our weekly basket online and we pick up our order at the library, just a short walk from home.

It couldn’t not be easier, fresher, more educational and interesting with new foods to explore all while we support our local producers right here in the Montreal area.

 

 

 

 

 

Traditional transport from the farm still on display

 

Nathalie and her ‘Bubs’ Phyllis getting ready for Halloween cooking

 

 

 

 

 

Read and watch more:

Global News

Montreal Gazette

Globe and Mail

Driving CSL forward with EVs

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Watch and share: I’ve advocated for the city to purchase its first Electric Vehicle and truck. I am pushing for the adoption of more EVs in CSL to reduce our dependence on fuel and to reduce pollution and noise. I am so convinced that I got one myself!

CSL Public Works took delivery of its first electric vehicle, a Kia Soul, in November 2016 (Photo: Bebe Newman)

Regarder et partager: J’ai plaidé pour que la ville achète son premier véhicule électrique et camion. Je préconise l’adoption de plus de véhicules électriques dans CSL afin de réduire notre dépendance au carburant et de réduire la pollution et le bruit. Je suis tellement convaincu que j’en ai acheté une moi-même!

Polaris electric vehicle makes demo debut at CSL Public Works in November 2016

 

I visited the ZENN (Zero Emission No Noise) Auto manufacturer in St. Jerome in Oct. 2008 and took this early model electric for a spin around the test track

 

My brand new 2017 Chevy Volt Electric Vehicle

City purchases two stream receptacles

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In an attempt to provide City residents with the opportunity to sort their waste on the streets, twostream waste receptacles have been purchased to replace some old, tired and one stream cans that are around the City.
“We are hoping to clean up the streets and direct the right waste into the right bins. We received many requests for street recycling bins, as our residents like to run/walk/bike and then get thirsty and have nowhere to throw their bottles,” said Public Works director Bebe Newman.

City Council authorized the purchase of 120 receptacles, partially paid out of a provincial grant, that were installed at almost all bus stops throughout the City and at several other locations on main streets, at certain parks and public spaces (bordering the street).

“We have had strong and positive reaction from the public,” said Newman.

Council approved  the purchase of an additional 50 receptacles for the City at a recent public council meeting.

Judge rejects developer’s lawsuit against Montreal over Meadowbrook

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Developer accused city of “disguised expropriation”

A Superior Court Judge has rejected a $44-million lawsuit against the city of Montreal over a proposed housing development on the Lachine side of the Meadowbrook Golf Course that failed to materialize.

In a 45-page judgement rendered Wednesday, Judge Pepita G. Capriolo ruled the city had not engaged in a “disguised expropriation,” as land owner Groupe Pacific alleged, nor was the city responsible for $15.5 million in potential profits the developer argued it could have made.

“The large number of difficulties that the developer faced before being able to start the project (negotiations with municipalities next to the site, with the city of Montreal, with Canadian Pacific and the suburban train authority AMT, the Ministry of the Environment, etc.) does not support the conclusion that only the actions of the city kept the developer from realizing the profits it had calculated,” the judge wrote.

Real-estate developer Groupe Pacific charged that the city used high infrastructure costs as an excuse to block construction of its project in order to preserve the golf course as a green space following citizen protests.

Groupe Pacific was demanding $28.5 million for the value of the land, and another $15 million for lost potential profits.

Meadowbrook Groupe Pacific, a subsidiary of Groupe Pacific, bought the land in 2006 for $3 million, and later presented a plan to build a pedestrian-friendly and environmentally responsible, 1600-unit residential complex dubbed Petite Rivière.

The city argued estimates of the infrastructure costs it would have had to shoulder to put in water and sewage pipes and a railway overpass ranged from $60 million to $150 million, costs that it would have taken at least 43 years to recoup in taxes. In 2010 it told Groupe Pacific it would not support development there because of the infrastructure bill, although it did not share its cost estimates with the developer.

“The judge got it right,” said Alan DeSousa, who was the executive committee member responsible for environmental issues for the city of Montreal in 2010. “It shows that cities do have the right and the ability to protect their environments.”

Côte-St-Luc councillor Dida Berku said the lawsuit is “very promising” for their municipality, which is the target of a $32-million lawsuit by Groupe Pacific that dates back to 2001.

In her judgment, Capriolo ruled Groupe Pacific had failed to prove the city had acted in bad faith, and noted that the city had not appropriated the land, which an evaluator has valued at $6.5 million. Under the city’s new land development management plan, Groupe Pacific is still free to operate it as a golf course or for other recreational purposes, she wrote. Groupe Pacific has the right to appeal the decision.

rbruemmer@postmedia.com

twitter.com/renebruemmer

Meadowbrook judgment ‘bodes well for CSL’

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The Superior Court judgment favouring Montreal against the developer of the Meadowbrook Golf Course, Meadowbrook Groupe Pacific, bodes well for Côte St. Luc in its own legal case with the developer, say Mayor Mitchell Brownstein, Councillor Dida Berku and mayoral candidate Robert Libman.

Groupe Pacific had sued Montreal for $44 million over the borough of Lachine’s refusal to allow residential building on its part of the site, which the borough attributed to high infrastructure costs. The other part of the site is in Côte St. Luc.

According to media reports, Judge Pepita G. Capriolo rejected Groupe Pacific’s contention that Montreal engaged in a disguised expropriation, and that the city was responsible for the developer losing $15.5 million in profits. Also according to reports, the judge ruled that many other factors prevented the development on the Lachine side.

 In the case of Côte St. Luc, the city was originally sued by the developer in 2000, when the city changed the zoning of its part of the golf course site from residential to recreational and commercial. The original lawsuit lay dormant for years, until Groupe Pacific changed its lawsuit to claim $32 million — $19 million of which was to force the city to basically buy the part of the land in its territory — a land swap: and $13 million for loss of profits.

As we reported in 2015, “the Quebec Superior Court did not allow the company to pursue the $19 million claim.”

Late in 2015, Groupe Pacific wanted to amend its lawsuit, to claim another $20 million. The developer wanted the Quebec Court of Appeal to state its opinion on the merits of such a re-amendment to the Quebec Superior Court. But the Court of Appeal ruled that it cannot decide on this in advance and that the Superior Court would have to decide if Groupe Pacific can reamend its claim. That is where the case with Côte St. Luc stands at this point.

Brownstein was pleased with last week’s judgement.

“The judgment in favour of Montreal is very promising for Côte St. Luc, because it essentially affirms what we have been arguing for years,” the Mayor said. “While there is still a case pending since [2000] against Côte St. Luc, this related decision validates many of our arguments.”

Berku, who has been defending the right of the city to maintain Meadowbrook for recreational use, said the decision is a “great victory for the right of cities to determine the best land use in the public interest. Montreal had the right to refuse to invest hundreds of millions in infrastructure, especially because all details of the project were not finalized.”

The councilllor added that the judge “decided that golf is a reasonable use, especially in light of the new urban plan adopted by the Montreal agglomeration in 2015, which designated all of Meadowbrook as green space for recreational use.

Libman, during a press conference Friday, was also very pleased. The zoning change from residential to recreational took place when he was Mayor of Côte St. Luc.

“It’s certainly very positive for Côte St. Luc — we were all waiting to see what the judgment would be on the Lachine side,” the mayoral candidate said. “I was going to be examined by the lawyers over the next few months. Now that there’s a precedent defeating the lawsuit against Lachine (Montreal), it certainly looks as though the lawsuit against Côte St. Luc for about $20 million will be dismissed, which is great news for our taxpayers and residents.”

Groupe Pacific has the option to appeal the latest judgment.

N

In my opinion:
Fantastic news for Cote Saint-Luc. I have always been an enthusiastic and outspoken opponent of developing Meadowbrook. Just check out the very many posts on my blog for the history on this file. As City Councillor I will continue to fight to preserve this invaluable greenspace for future generations. I would be thrilled to have this space acquired by the Montreal Agglomeration to be shared by all across the West End as a regional park.

City to plant 200 trees

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A 200 year old Bur Oak at the corner of Wavell and Melling. It is possibly the oldest of its kind on the island.

Public Works is trying to meet our annual tree planting goal of 200 trees a year, contributing to the reforestation of our community (and the canopy that had been previously compromised by the Ash Borer Disease).

To date during 2017, we have planted approximately 70 trees.

Last week City Council approved a contract that will enable us to plant up to 100 more trees throughout the City, specifically at the front lawns of residents. Residents have received official letters that the trees will be planted and were encouraged to choose the variety available. Although these residents
have been waiting for their trees for a couple of years, they were happy to know that we would be planting this fall.

This work will be done by the contractor, Les Terrassements Multi-Paysages Inc. for $56,000. while the City employees will be planting other trees in public spaces.

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