CSL population grows, a bit

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The 2016 census figures are in and Cote Saint-Luc registered a mini population growth spurt of just 127 residents more than in 2011.

CSL now has 32,448 residents, a growth of just 0.4%.

It’s interesting to note that the census metropolitan area of Vancouver has the highest population density in Canada, with 5,492.6 people per square kilometre, followed by the Montreal suburbs of Westmount and… you guessed it, Cote Saint-Luc with 4,662.5 people per square kilometre.  Toronto ranks 8th on the list at 4,334.4 people per square kilometre.

While our population remains relatively unchanged in CSL, Quebec’s overall growth has slowed significantly to 3.3% since 2011. This places us in 8th position out of the 13 provinces and territories. Wonder why?

Previous census figures show our average age is decreasing in CSL. When more data is released later this year we’ll see if this trend is continuing.

These numbers also help our city in planning for services to meet the needs of our demographics. Also worth noting, is that several new buildings are either in construction (such as on The Avenue and on Parkhaven) or pre-construction (on Marc-Chagall) that will bring in several hundred new residents in the next year or two. This will add to our density as well as our demand on infrastructure (roads, sewers, utility) and services (recreation, library, EMS, etc…).

See more information on the Census Canada web page for CSL as well as at CTV News.

For more info on how CSL fared in the 2011 census use the search window on the top right of this page (search: Census 2011).

What do you think about these numbers? Are we better or worse off by our growing population?

 

 

Happy New Year | Bonne Année

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Wishing you health, happiness and peace in the new year.

Je vous souhaite une très bonne année, pleine de joie, de bonne santé et de belles surprises.

Year End Roundup: Inside City Hall with Mayor Mitchell Brownstein

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Cote Saint-Luc Mayor Mitchell Brownstein has done a magnificent job in rallying all those around him since becoming mayor nine months ago. Mitch has brilliantly achieved consensus among members of council, has strengthened the city administration and brought our unions onside.  He is building upon a magnificent legacy created over a decade by former Mayor Anthony Housefather.

As an outgoing, effervescent and engaging full-time mayor. He created this wonderful recap of Cote Saint-Luc activities and accomplishments in 2016.

“We are a very special family,” the mayor said. Enjoy this video, these beautiful holidays, and take the time to count your blessings and appreciate all we have and the good times we share.”

New dog-friendly parks in Côte Saint-Luc

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Child Dog Snow

 The City of Côte Saint-Luc recently launched a pilot project  to allow dogs on leashes in six parks and several green spaces.

 

“Dog owners have told us they appreciate being able to bring their pets to city parks and green spaces,” Mayor Mitchell Brownstein said. “We found a good balance by selecting certain parks and ensuring a safe distance from playgrounds and splash pads for the pilot project.”

 

When in public, dog owners must always keep their dog on a leash, have up-to-date dog tags issued by Côte Saint-Luc or any other municipality, and scoop up after their dog.

 

The parks or green spaces that now allow leashed dogs include Aaron Hart Park along David Lewis St., Harold Greenspon Park on Borden Ave., the green space between Marc Chagall Ave. and the parking lot of the Bernard Lang Civic Centre, the green space on Baily Rd. between Northluc and Cavendish, the green space on Baily Rd. between Lyndale and Glencrest, and a section of Kirwan Park between Blossom and Wentworth.

 

“We’ve achieved our goal of having dog-friendly parks that serve all parts of the city,” Mayor Brownstein said. “We will continue to monitor how the parks or green spaces are being used, to decide whether we should expand dog-friendly parks to more areas.”

 

The city’s exclusive dog park is located on Mackle Rd, between Caldwell and Parkhaven.
We wish all our Côte Saint-Luc dogs and their owners a happy, tail-wagging holiday season.

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Baron Byng Class of ’39 meets for the 77th time

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By George Nashen:

Baron Byng Class of '39. Left side: Classmates Eddie Wolkove, Nina Cass, George Nashen and his wife. Right side: Mildred Leiter, Samuel Levy and his wife.

Baron Byng Class of ’39. Left side: Classmates Eddie Wolkove, Nina Cass, George Nashen and his wife. Right side: Mildred Leiter, Samuel Levy and his wife.

 

Once again, as we’ve done year after year, the notable Baron Byng high school graduation class of 1939 met recently for our annual reunion, this one being the 77th anniversary.

The sad news is that our numbers are dwindling, as we reach the age of 93. However, six graduates met recently at a West End breakfast place and we hope to continue to meet as long as possible, even if only two of us are remaining.

Mamie Trager had this to say: “It’s a miracle that we are still here.”

Sam Levy said, “We produced many medal winners in various fields.”

From Nina Cass, “I am happy to be here.”

Eddie Wolkove, who has been the reunion organizer for more than fifty years, stated, “We are truly blessed.”

Mildred Leiter added, “Although our numbers are dwindling it is still a pleasure to be here.”

George Nashen, Class of '39

George Nashen, Class of ’39

As for me (George Nashen), “What a wonderful feeling it is to meet with classmates from 80+  years ago. Although there are a few more classmates still around, the inability of them meeting with us varies from distance in other parts of the world whereas other ones are closer but unable to attend because of illness, either physical or emotional.”

Baron Byng High School. Established in 1921 by the Protestant School Board of Greater Montréal, Baron Byng High School taught mostly Jewish students and has several well-known graduates including Irving Layton and Mordecai Richler. Circa 1970. Source : Jewish Public Library. Historical Photographs Collection, 88-107.

Baron Byng High School.
Established in 1921 by the Protestant School Board of Greater Montréal, Baron Byng High School taught mostly Jewish students and has several well-known graduates including Irving Layton and Mordecai Richler.
Circa 1970.
Source : Jewish Public Library. Historical Photographs Collection, 88-107.

The Baron Byng class of 39 included:

  • Mortimor “Michael” Fainstadt, a Montreal City Councillor from the Drapeau era
  • Mel Dobrin of the Seinberg empire
  • Sollie Goldfarb, who hosted many reunions at his country estate in Plantagenet, Ontario
  • Jacob Singer, George’s closest friend, who went MIA laying mines in the North Sea in 1944
  • Sylvia Bercovitch, noted Montreal artist

I recall some other interesting tidbits from way back then:

  • Favourite teacher: Mr. RA Patterson, the nicest person
  • Favourite schoolyard activity: chasing girls
  • We all lived close by and walked to school
  • Baron Byng was made even more famous by Mordechai Richler
  • Who was Baron Byng? He was Governor General in 1923, the year I, and most of my classmates were born. He was a WWI hero.

CJN Article about 65th Class reunion

Baron Byng High School Museum

 

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MP Housefather brings job fair close to home

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Urban coyotes spotted in CSL

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There have been reports of coyote sightings in Côte Saint-Luc. The recent sighting (October 2016) was behind homes on Holland, near the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks.

Typically, coyotes are present along the gullies next to railroad tracks. In fact, CP has a program in place to trap coyotes, but it only starts on October 25, which is when hunting season opens in Quebec.

Urban coyotes do not feast on pets and garbage; they typically stick to a natural diet.

Due to sensationalist reporting, many urban residents think all coyotes are out to eat their dog or cat at the first opportunity or that they’re dumpster divers of the first degree. On the contrary, studies have shown that urban coyotes stick mainly to a natural diet.

According to wildlife experts, there are things people can do to discourage coyotes from entering back yards or private property.

Discourage coyotes from entering your property by removing brush piles or areas that may be perceived as a resting place or den.

Don’t feed coyotes. Ensure garbage, bird feed, and pet food is inaccessible. Avoid leaving food from fruit trees on the ground.

Keep pets attended and on leash. Supervise animals when they are in the yard. Cats should not be permitted to roam freely.
Do not turn your back on, or run from, a coyote. Stand tall, wave your arms and make lots of noise.

Trapping and killing or relocating urban coyotes does not reduce the overall population of coyotes.

A common reaction from urban and suburban residents when they learn coyotes are living in their areas is to ask for the removal of the coyotes, either through lethal means or by trapping and relocating them. However, animal control officers have learned through a lot of experience that this in NOT only a lot harder to do than it sounds, but does nothing to reduce the number of coyotes living in an area. In fact, it has the opposite effect.

Watch this video from the Town of Oakville for more useful information showing how to scare coyotes away from your property.

 

 

For more information visit the CSL website.

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