City says roadwork coming to larger section of Côte-Saint-Luc Rd. — in 2020

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The negligence in the upkeep of Montreal’s section of CSL Road is an embarrassment and a danger. Two more years of this state of disrepair is unacceptable.

 

 

CBC News:   City says roadwork coming to larger section of Côte-Saint-Luc Rd. — in 2020
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/c%C3%B4te-saint-luc-road-disrepair-construction-2020-1.4787995

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Montreal appeals court order to bury Meadowbrook stream

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Part of the Little St. Pierre River wends through the Meadowbrook Golf Course, appeal, sewer, bury
Creek that runs through golf course is last remnant of a river that once flowed from the western slopes of Mount Royal to Old Montreal.Channelling the Meadowbrook creek into an underground storm sewer would result in lost opportunities to rehabilitate this sector, city says in its appeal.  PHOTO JO ANN GOLDWATER / LES AMIS DE MEADOWBROOK

Montreal is appealing a ruling ordering it to bury a contaminated creek on the Meadowbrook Golf Club that is the last remnant of the St-­Pierre River.

In an appeal presented in the Quebec Court of Appeal Wednesday, the city argues that Quebec Superior Court Judge Chantal Corriveau erred in her June 7 judgment obliging it to turn the creek into a sewer within 18 months. It notes that Quebec’s Environment Quality Act calls for integrated management of wetlands and bodies of water in keeping with the principles of sustainable development and requires authorities to prevent the loss of wetlands and bodies of water.

As part of a natural drainage basin, the brook “constitutes an important asset for which upgrading work is to be implemented,” the city argues, adding that plans to rehabilitate part of the St-Pierre River are being studied and a master plan on drainage basins on the island of Montreal is underway.

Restoring the creek could be a key feature of a plan for rainwater management in an area stretching from the Blue Bonnets site at Décarie Blvd. and Jean-Talon St. to the Lachine Canal, including a possible green corridor from the Meadowbrook Golf Course to the canal, the appeal says.

“On the other hand, channelling the Meadowbrook creek into an underground storm sewer would result in lost opportunities to rehabilitate this sector, create new, green infrastructures downstream and allow an outlet for excess water that would relieve pressure on underground infrastructures,” it says.

The winding, 200-­metre creek on the 57-­hectare golf course is “the last section of the former St-Pierre River that is still in existence,” the city notes.

The golf course straddles Côte St-Luc and Montreal, but the creek flows above ground only on the Montreal side, since Côte St-Luc diverted its section into the sewer system decades ago.

Developer Meadowbrook Groupe Pacific Inc., which owns the golf course, had sued Montreal, demanding that the creek be buried, describing it as nothing more than a ditch and an open-­air sewer.

However, judge Corriveau ruled the creek is indeed a river, based on a study by the Quebec environment department confirming it is part of the former St-Pierre. Originating on Mount Royal, it flowed through present-day Snowdon, Côte St-Luc, Ville St-Pierre and St-Henri — where it fed a lake on the site of the Turcot Yards — to Old Montreal. Explorer Samuel de Champlain described the river, then teeming with fish, when he explored Montreal in 1611.

The Meadowbrook creek is fed by a storm sewer in Côte St-Luc and disappears into a combined sewer in Montreal. Repeated studies have shown it is contaminated by fecal coliform bacteria originating in crossed sewer and storm-water pipes at as many as 218 addresses in Côte St-Luc and Montreal West.

In its appeal, the city argues the solution to the contamination is not turning the creek into a sewer but rather fixing the crossed connections.

Montreal had tried unsuccessfully to have the other two municipalities named as co-defendants in the lawsuit, since the contamination originates on their territory.

It also argues that the timetable set by Corriveau is not feasible. The judge ordered the city to apply to the provincial environment department for a permit to bury the river within four months, to clean up the contamination within 18 months and to decontaminate the former riverbed and banks within 24 months. That simply isn’t enough time to get the jobs done, the city says.

Based on previous experience of correcting crossed sewer pipes in Kirkland, it would take at least two to five years to fix the crossed pipes in Côte St-Luc and Montreal West, not counting the time needed for further investigation, the city says.

It asked the appeal court for permission to present new evidence on a viable solution, on a realistic timetable, and on which contaminants are polluting the creek.

Even though Meadowbrook Groupe Pacific won the case, it is also appealing the ruling. In an appeal filed July 5, the developer asks the court to order the city to eliminate the creek whether or not the environment department gives its permission, and whether or not it is contaminated.

The appeal seeks to “modify the earlier judgment so that the order clearly forces the city to achieve a result that puts an end to any flow of water on the surface of the property of the appellant and that this obligation not be subject to any condition.”

Since the creek is fed by a storm sewer, the city should be ordered to cut off the flow of water whatever the environment department decides, the appeal argues.

In September, Quebec Superior Court Judge rejected a $44-­million lawsuit by Groupe Pacific against Montreal claiming that the city had engaged in a “disguised expropriation” to block a proposed 1,600-unit housing project on the Meadowbrook site.

Groupe Pacific was demanding $28.5 million for the value of the land, and another $15 million for lost potential profits. Meadowbrook Groupe Pacific, a subsidiary of Groupe Pacific, bought the land in 2006 for $3 million.

In 2015, the city of Montreal designated its portion of the Meadowbrook site as “large green space or recreational,” marking a victory for conservationists who had battled for a quarter­-century to preserve the site from development.

Côte­ St-­Luc zoned its portion of the site as recreational in 2000.

mscott@postmedia.com

Could CSL vCOP, PS and Police host summer camp for kids? Longueuil police host first ever camp for aspiring young detectives

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A group of kids took part in a day camp put on by the Longueuil police this week, where they got to learn about police work. (CBC)

What a novel idea in summer programming for kids. Sign up a group of pre-teens and expose them to first responders: police, fire, EMS, ambulance, public security and volunteer Citizens on Patrol. Teach them essential skills and expose them to these critical and life-saving services. Excite, inspire and educate them.

Would such a program be possible in Cote Saint-Luc and suburban Montreal municipalities? Would you sign up your pre-teen?

Source: Longueuil police host first ever camp for aspiring young detectives | CBC News

Côte-St-Luc cold case: Killing haunts daughters nearly 19 years on | Montreal Gazette

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At first, Naomi Mouadeb called often. After the initial blur of the first few days, every week or so she picked up the phone and dialled the same number. Then it became every couple of months. Then, gradually, two calls a year became one: every Sept. 2.

The last time she tried calling, in 2015, no one answered.

Source: Côte-St-Luc cold case: Killing haunts daughters nearly 19 years on | Montreal Gazette

The shift to electric cars: Are we there yet?

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This is an excellent piece by Rene Bruemmer in today’s Montreal Gazette. Most people don’t realize the vast benefits of going all, or partially, electric. The Quebec government grant is significant and we have the lowest hydro electric costs in North America.

It’s been two years since I switched to an EV. My Chevrolet Volt, with an average 85 KM per charge covers all of my city driving needs and most of my highway journeys to the Laurentians. Beyond that, if I was to drive to Toronto, New York or Boston, I have no range anxiety as my gas engine charges my battery extending my range well over 500 KMs.

I plug in to a regular outlet in my garage every few nights to top up my battery for literally pennies a night as I rarely need a full charge. Our Volt, which we affectionately nicknamed “Evie”, quickly moved from second vehicle status to the primary position. We doubled our expected annual mileage thereby speeding up our return on investment for the up front added cost.

We feel good about doing our part for the environment, love the quiet roll of the car, the instant power of the electric motor, the ease of charging and paying for cheap, home-grown, clean energy and especially rolling silently past the gas stations with their $1.40 per litre signs.

Are you there yet?

 

Source: The shift to electric cars: Are we there yet?

My brand new 2017 Chevy Volt Electric Vehicle

Leaf blowers are a menace to our quiet, suburban neighbourhoods: Beaconsfield council to vote to restrict the use of leaf blowers

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Leaf blowers are a menace to our quiet, suburban neighbourhoods.

They are polluting our cities, spewing toxins, dust and noise from their wailing motors.

Rather than depositing fallen leaves into our environmental, government-mandated composters, these aggravating agitators blast nature’s fallen foliage into our streets and across our sidewalks only to be blown back by gusts of wind onto the next lawn over. Even worse, our soon-to-be clogged city catch-basins and drains will require even noisier and more-polluting over-sized vacuum vehicles on scene. We’re paying the price.

But we don’t have to pay such a heavy price. City Councils, near and far, should give consideration to this wise decision by our neighbours in Beaconsfield.

Of course, gardeners will spend more time collecting and depositing leaves, grass clippings and the like. However, the cost will not only balance out in less need for municipal crews and equipment but we will reap the immediate benefit of healthier, more tranquil places that we wanted when we moved to the neighbourhood.

 

Source: Beaconsfield council to vote to restrict the use of leaf blowers

D’Arcy McGee medals awarded

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From left, Sarah Buzaglo, Lina Fortin, David Birnbaum, Glenn Nashen, and Lynn and Jeff Weinstein.
Joel Goldenberg Photo

The annual D’Arcy McGee Citizenship Medals, conceived by area MNA David Birnbaum, were awarded at a ceremony recently to École des amis-du-monde principal Lina Fortin, former Côte St. Luc councillor Glenn Nashen and, posthumously, community activist Gerry Weinstein.

As well, Maimonide secondary IV student Sarah Buzaglo won the third annual Victor C. Goldbloom Vivre ensemble essay contest.

The ceremony was held outside the Bernard Lang Civic Centre in Côte St. Luc. The jury was made up of former D’Arcy McGee MNAs Herbert Marx, Robert Libman and Lawrence Bergman. The latter two attended the ceremony, but Marx could not due to illness. Also on hand were CSL Mayor Mitchell Brownstein and members of his council, and Hampstead Mayor William Steinberg and Councillor Michael Goldwax.

Of Fortin, Birnbaum said: “During her tenure, Lina has made it her mission to create a positive and inclusive school for her students — a school open to the world and ready to accompany every student on a positive journey as they strive to master French, and every other subject.”

Of Nashen, Birnbaum said he has “matched an exemplary professional career with an equally impressive record of volunteer community service. Glenn conceived, organized and initiated ‘Volunteer Citizens on Patrol’ (vCOPs) 11 years ago. They help individuals with safety and security matters and assist in crowd control at local events and in emergencies. Glenn was also actively involved in Emergency Medical Services for over 30 years. One of the highlights as CSL City Councillor was his initiation and introduction of Canada’s first municipal legislation requiring bike helmets in 1992.”

Birnbaum praised Weinstein as a “true and selfless community activist who would leave no stone unturned in order to do good for those more vulnerable. Gerry was instrumental in the development of B’nai Brith House, a 95-unit residence of affordable housing in Côte St. Luc. The residence that now bears his name along with that of Ted Greenfield is a model for fulfilling seniors’ housing needs in a dignified and fulfilling manner.”

Weinstein’s son Jeff, on hand with his mother Lynn, accepted the medal.

In her winning essay, Buzaglo wrote: “In order to ‘live together’, the world must unite and live as a whole. In other words, we must work together to better ourselves and evolve. We must take into account all the external conflicts that set barriers in order to achieve this.”

Premier Philippe Couillard also offered congratulations to the winners in a video shot with Birnbaum, praising each of the medal winners for their accomplishments.

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