New bike path and EV charging station coming to City Hall parking lot

Leave a comment

 

The reconstruction of the of the Cote Saint-Luc City Hall parking lot will soon be underway with a new layout to improve vehicular access and visibility while improving pedestrian safety.

The project includes the reconstruction of the sidewalks, the curbs, the asphalt roadway and parking area, as well as the replacement of the lighting and security cameras.

The main improvements include:

– A new drop-off area at the main rear entrance,
– An elevated section of the roadway and pedestrian crosswalks at the intersection of the
main roadway from Cavendish and the delivery ramp for City Hall,
– A new sidewalk on the south side of City Hall, from Cavendish to the main rear entrance,
– A new central sidewalk median for pedestrians in the main section of the parking lot,
– A new bike path from Cavendish to Sir Walter Scott,
– A double charging station for electric vehicles,
– The addition of approximately 23 parking spaces, (143 spaces compared to the current 120 spaces),
– Replacement of the street lighting and cameras for improved safety.

The work is scheduled to start in July and be completed by mid-October 2017.

Public tenders were opened by the Purchasing Department on June 7, 2017. Six tenders were received ranging in price from $1,941,716.78 to $2,322,010.66 all taxes included. The lowest tender was received from Groupe TNT Inc. is conforming to the tender documents for a total of $1,941,716.78 taxes included.

A previous purchase order was issued for electric vehicle charging stations at the Aquatic and Community Centre and at City Hall. The City Hall EV double charging station will be installed during the reconstruction.

 

New site now in the plans for new synagogue

Leave a comment

A register for a rezoning bylaw to enable a new synagogue to be created on Mackle Road by the Fondation Sepharade Kollel Avrechim was held on Thursday, June 15 at City Hall. 23 people signed the register. Only 17 were required to sign in order to call for a referendum.

The register was called for, under provincial law governing rezoning, after 33 out of 56 eligible residents signed a petition to demand the register a month earlier.

Mayor Mitchell Brownstein said if enough people sign the register, there will be no need for a referendum and, as a result, another location will have to be found for the synagogue.

The city wishes to help its residents and support its institutions. Given the results we will help the congregation to find a new location.

As the Councillor for the area (District 6) I believe it is important to keep our residents united and supportive of one another. I am confident that a better solution can be found to meet everyone’s needs.

Mayor Brownstein said he met with the residents and Rabbi Benoliol after the register closed and assured everyone that we shall work together as a community to find the congregation a more suitable place for them in our City.  The mayor said we are moving quickly to find solutions and all parties are pleased with our proactive approach and that he expects to be able to announce an excellent alternative shortly.  We are a beautiful, proud community that shall always find solutions to accommodate each other through consensus building, he said.

New CSL bylaw changes construction hours for new buildings

Leave a comment

Côte St. Luc council passed a change to the city’s noise bylaw in response to complaints from residents on Marc Chagall and Mackle about ongoing construction, including on weekends, of two rental apartment buildings in the area.

Construction began in late March on Phase 1 of Le Carlyle, which will consist of two 12-storey buildings.

“We’re prohibiting work on weekends for new construction, and after 7 p.m. on weekdays for new construction,” Mayor Mitchell Brownstein explained. “That does not mean if you’re extending or putting something on your house. It’s for a new building.”

But the mayor also pointed out that the existing noise bylaw allows for a process to apply for a special permit to work beyond the limits of the new bylaw.

“For this particular developer, who has certain requirements to work beyond the terms of no weekends and not after 7 p.m weekdays, we negotiated a deal reducing the amount of time he would be working, limiting the amount of days he will be working on weekends, and we have a schedule which we will share with residents, explaining the deal.”

Brownstein explained that in exchange for the special permit being issued to the Le Carlyle developer, “he has a written undertaking with the city that he will not contest the amended noise bylaw.

“In law, when somebody gets a construction permit and there’s an existing bylaw, if we change that bylaw mid-process, there’s the risk of contestation. What we negotiated is good for the residents and the city, and the future of the city, because future developers will know clearly what their limits are and what they’re able to do.”

Area Councillor Mike Cohen said he has received numerous phone calls of complaints about the construction, and he formed a committee of condo and townhouse representatives to meet on the issue.

“Mayor Brownstein and I met with representatives from the condos, and we had the developers in the room, and there was a good consensus.”

CSL resolution marks Federation CJA’s 100th

Leave a comment

By Joel Goldenberg, The Suburban  05.24.17

Côte St. Luc council unanimously passed a resolution last week marking the 100th anniversary of the Jewish community organization Federation CJA.

Along with the resolution, a video was played with Mayor Mitchell Brownstein congratulating the organization.

“Today, Federation CJA is a model for how a community organization — with the help of countless volunteers — can come together to help build a community,” the Mayor said.

The resolution, moved by Councillor Glenn Nashen, points out that many Côte St. Luc residents “have received financial, social and other assistance by Federation CJA and its agencies;

“The organization played a role in the resettlement of a significant number of immigrants, and particularly Holocaust survivors, contributed to the economic, cultural and academic success of our region and today through its charitable efforts supports a wide range of activities that service the 93,000 Jews in Quebec.”

The resolution congratulates Federation CJA on reaching its milestone and also “recognizes the important work of Federation CJA over its history in building the Jewish community here at home, in Israel and around the world, and in serving as a bridge to facilitate dialogue, tolerance and cooperation between the Jewish population and the broader Quebec society.

CSL council votes 5-2 to allow rezoning process for synagogue

Leave a comment

CSL council votes 5-2 to allow rezoning process for synagogue

Côte St. Luc council voted 5-2 last week at a standing-room only meeting to pass a second reading of a rezoning bylaw that would enable the creation of a new synagogue on Mackle Road near Quartier Cavendish.

Councillors Glenn Nashen, Allan Levine, Mike Cohen, Sidney Benizri and Sam Goldbloom voted in favour, Ruth Kovac and Steven Erdelyi voted against, and Dida Berku abstained due to her involvement as a lawyer in a legal case unrelated to the rezoning but linked to a court case involving Fondation Sepharade Kollel Avrechim’s spiritual leader, Rabbi Yehouda Benoliel.

At a recent meeting, residents raised concerns about the potential for increased foot and car traffic, noise, late night activity, lowered property values, illegal parking and lost taxes for the city from a religious institution resulting in increased taxes for homeowners, and also brought up the phenomenon of “makeshift” synagogues on residential streets.

Those council members who voted in favour said residents will have their say by choosing whether to call for a register, which could then prompt a referendum. At last week’s meeting, one Mackle Road resident presented a petition, and told council that more than enough people signed to, as part of the bylaw process, potentilly force a referendum.

Councillor Allan Levine gave an impassioned speech in favour of the rezoning. The councillor said while he is grateful that, in Côte St. Luc, no one would vote against him because he is Jewish, others who are Jewish don’t have the same level of comfort — such as students wearing kippahs at Concordia University, and Jews living in France.

Kovac stressed that she was not opposed to the synagogue, but to the proposed location.

“I will not speak about religion or being Jewish — as a child of Holocaust survivors, I couldn’t be more sensitive,” she said.

Kovac explained that several years ago, the council went through an extensive and rigorous exercise of redefining the Cavendish Mall land, much of which is now residential.

“After public consultations, no one opposed the rezoning [to mostly residential from commercial] or the plans submitted,” she explained. “There were no surprises. Today, we are asked to spot zone one lot to accommodate a request for a religious institution.

“The Cavendish Mall… today has voiced their very strong opposition, knowing events taking place at the synagogue would spill onto their property and that parking would become an issue for their customers.

“My vote opposed to the motion is not opposed to the Kollel. I am pro the status quo, not anti-anything else. We should work together to find the appropriate alternate location, and we will work to help you find one, or to find a way to improve your current location.

“What some of the residents have already raised is that this organization has more than one tax-exempt property, they don’t have one, they don’t have two, they don’t have three, they have four or five. Is that really fair to the taxpayer, who this year had significant increases, and for the rest of the community to bear?” We contacted Rabbi Benoliel on this issue, and are waiting for a response.

N

In my opinion:

As I said at this public council meeting, this matter has nothing to do with religion or support for a synagogue. We are a city of many religions, languages and residents of all backgrounds, even if the majority are of the Jewish faith. Some are very religious, others somewhat and yet others traditional or secular. We all live in peace and harmony in respect of one another which makes Cote Saint-Luc an incredible place to live and to raise a family. Let’s be sure to keep it this way.

This issue is strictly about the zoning that would be appropriate in this location. The requester, Rabbi Benoliel and the Kollel Avrechim have purchased this property and they have the legal right to request rezoning.

At the same time the residents in the immediate and adjoining area have the legal right, and the final say, on whether or not to permit the rezoning.

The mayor and majority of councillors have agreed to follow provincial law which calls for a three step process whereby residents have their say. This is the only way of having an definitive, official and legal count of those residents who are in favour or against the proposed project. 

The first step is underway and those who live in the affected and adjoining zone who oppose have until May 25 at 4:30PM to advise the city. Details available in this week’s Suburban Newspaper or at www.cotesaintluc.org/publicnotices.

Opinion: Safety should trump language for Quebec highway signs | Montreal Gazette

Leave a comment

The following is an excellent opinion piece by my friends Ruth and Harold. The petition to allow for bilingual sfaety signs on Quebec highways is on the National Assembly website, which has over 5,000 signatures. The petition can be seen and signed at www.assnat.qc.ca/en/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6407/index.html

Opinion: Safety should trump language for Quebec highway signs | Montreal Gazette

City updates emergency preparedness plan

Leave a comment

emergency preparedness plan 2017

 

The City of Côte Saint-Luc Emergency Preparedness Plan is one of the most important documents prepared by the elected officials and staff at City Hall. This plan sets out the framework for the protection of the people, environment and infrastructure before, during and after a disaster.

Emergency preparedness in the City is overseen by the Emergency Preparedness Committee, which I have chaired since first being elected in 1990. The committee is comprised of elected officials, staff and partners in emergency, health, social and technical services. This plan creates a process to avoid or reduce the damage and suffering caused by disasters and requires effective coordination between many internal and external resources.

 

All residents play an important role too to protect their family and home. Visit the Emergency Preparedness page at http://www.CoteSaintLuc.org to learn what you can do today to prepare for the first 72 hours of a disaster.

The City Council, staff and partners are hard at work behind the scenes, ensuring that the City is always ready and helping our residents feel safe and secure. This plan is updated on a regular basis to ensure that the City is always ready to handle any type of disaster – natural or man-made.

The City of Côte Saint-Luc Emergency Preparedness Plan addresses the preparation for, mitigation of, response to and recovery from disasters affecting the City
and its residents. The Emergency Preparedness Plan is mission-focused, as the source of the disaster is of secondary importance.

A prioritized list of threats, with the possible effects and impacts on people and on infrastructure is presented based on discussions by the City’s Emergency Preparedness Committee.

In preparing for and responding to a disaster, each group has important roles and responsibilities to fulfill. This includes elected officials, senior management, employees, volunteers and partners. A detailed training program is also presented, to allow responders different scenarios and opportunities to practice their skills, so that they are better prepared in a real emergency.

The Emergency Management Organization is divided into two important decision centres: the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and the Emergency Site Management (ESM) teams. The EOC is responsible for strategic planning, dealing with regional and provincial partners, planning for business continuity, recovery and high-level decision making. The ESM team is responsible for providing service at the scene of the disaster.

The four missions of the City are:
(1) Social Services
(2) Public Works
(3) Communications
(4) Administration & Logistics

Each of the missions is divided into specific functions or tasks, with different departments or partners designated as being responsible, partner or support.
The goal of the document is to ensure that the City is prepared to respond to disasters, whenever, wherever and however they occur. The updated plan was officially adopted by way of a public resolution at the January public council meeting. I am proud to have moved the resolution.

 

Free Press | Jan. 31, 2017 | Click to enlarge

Free Press | Jan. 31, 2017 | Click to enlarge

Older Entries