City updates emergency preparedness plan

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emergency preparedness plan 2017

 

The City of Côte Saint-Luc Emergency Preparedness Plan is one of the most important documents prepared by the elected officials and staff at City Hall. This plan sets out the framework for the protection of the people, environment and infrastructure before, during and after a disaster.

Emergency preparedness in the City is overseen by the Emergency Preparedness Committee, which I have chaired since first being elected in 1990. The committee is comprised of elected officials, staff and partners in emergency, health, social and technical services. This plan creates a process to avoid or reduce the damage and suffering caused by disasters and requires effective coordination between many internal and external resources.

 

All residents play an important role too to protect their family and home. Visit the Emergency Preparedness page at http://www.CoteSaintLuc.org to learn what you can do today to prepare for the first 72 hours of a disaster.

The City Council, staff and partners are hard at work behind the scenes, ensuring that the City is always ready and helping our residents feel safe and secure. This plan is updated on a regular basis to ensure that the City is always ready to handle any type of disaster – natural or man-made.

The City of Côte Saint-Luc Emergency Preparedness Plan addresses the preparation for, mitigation of, response to and recovery from disasters affecting the City
and its residents. The Emergency Preparedness Plan is mission-focused, as the source of the disaster is of secondary importance.

A prioritized list of threats, with the possible effects and impacts on people and on infrastructure is presented based on discussions by the City’s Emergency Preparedness Committee.

In preparing for and responding to a disaster, each group has important roles and responsibilities to fulfill. This includes elected officials, senior management, employees, volunteers and partners. A detailed training program is also presented, to allow responders different scenarios and opportunities to practice their skills, so that they are better prepared in a real emergency.

The Emergency Management Organization is divided into two important decision centres: the Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and the Emergency Site Management (ESM) teams. The EOC is responsible for strategic planning, dealing with regional and provincial partners, planning for business continuity, recovery and high-level decision making. The ESM team is responsible for providing service at the scene of the disaster.

The four missions of the City are:
(1) Social Services
(2) Public Works
(3) Communications
(4) Administration & Logistics

Each of the missions is divided into specific functions or tasks, with different departments or partners designated as being responsible, partner or support.
The goal of the document is to ensure that the City is prepared to respond to disasters, whenever, wherever and however they occur. The updated plan was officially adopted by way of a public resolution at the January public council meeting. I am proud to have moved the resolution.

 

Free Press | Jan. 31, 2017 | Click to enlarge

Free Press | Jan. 31, 2017 | Click to enlarge

CSL, residents must work together in emergency situations: mayor

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Suburban | September 24, 2014 | Click to enlarge

Suburban | September 24, 2014 | Click to enlarge

Emergency Preparedness Plan Presented

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Cote Saint-Luc is renowned as a municipality that has been a leader for decades in Emergency Preparedness and Public Safety. Our EMS, which started in the early 1960s as a civil protection organization known as EMO is more than 50 years old.
Emergency Prep Phases
I joined EMO some 35 years ago followed by Ruth Kovac a few years later. The two of us have been partners in promoting disaster planning and safety ever since. We attended the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada in the early 1990s (along with the late Vera Danyluk, former mayor of TMR and chair of the MUC) and many disaster conferences and training sessions since.
Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

I have headed up the city’s Emergency Preparedness committee for many years. Our goal is to to plan, to review, to practice and to be prepared!
But no training is as good as real live practice and we have had our fair share in Cote Saint-Luc. From floods and ice storms to dangerous heat waves we have managed local disaster to mitigate risk and inconvenience to our residents and bring situations back to normal as quickly as possible. Ruth and I have personally worked through these disasters and we’ve headed up teams of incredible volunteers and professional, skilled staff.
Our point person on this dossier is Jordy Reichson. Jordy has spent a significant part of his life honing his skills in disaster management. We have volunteered together and for many years and he has served as the city’s director of public safety, a department encompassing EMS, vCOP, Public Security, emergency communications and Emergency Preparedness as well as relations with all other emergency services.
Jordy presented an overview of our Emergency Preparedness Plan earlier this week in a public meeting, highlighting some of its changes and improvements over the years, explaining the city’s readiness to deal with disaster. The full presentation can be viewed below.
 http://youtu.be/s6W7uqsMSWs

City to unveil highlights of disaster plan

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The City of Côte Saint-Luc will unveil a summary of its disaster plan to the public on Monday, September 15 at 8pm at City Hall, 5801 Cavendish Blvd.
“We have updated our plan this year and our city council, staff, and volunteers are trained on what to do in case of a disaster or major emergency,” Mayor Anthony Housefather said. “We want to give residents an overview of the plan and explain how it would be used in an emergency.”
Councillor Glenn J. Nashen, the council member responsible for emergency preparedness will also discuss how residents can prepare for the first 72 hours of an emergency.
“Even with the best disaster plan and the best execution of that plan, it may take emergency workers some time to get to you because they have to prioritize who needs the most help,” Councillor Nashen said. “In the event of a major emergency, residents need to be prepared, too, with enough bottled water, canned foods, medication, and anything else you require.”
For more information on how to prepare for an emergency, visit CoteSaintLuc.org/EmergencyPreparedness.

Emergency mass notification coming to Cote Saint-Luc

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Emergency_notification_system

Cote Saint-Luc City Council has signed on to Everbridge Mass Notification System that will enable the City to send notifications to individuals or groups using lists, locations, and visual intelligence. This comprehensive notification system keeps everyone informed before, during, and after events whether emergency or non-emergency.

How an organization responds to a critical situation can mean the difference between success and failure. Well thought-through emergency preparedness planning translates into the ability to communicate quickly and effectively.

Quick and reliable communication is critical to the operations of any municipality. whether related to criminal activities, severe weather or missing persons, the ability to quickly and reliably reach staff, emergency personnel, volunteers and citizens – over any voice or text device – and confirm receipt of notifications – can help protect life and property.

Situational intelligence provides critical insight into developing events and can be used by authorities to help prevent a crisis before it occurs or to manage the aftermath of an incident.

The Mass Notification System in Cote Saint-Luc is one of several Emergency Preparedness initiatives the City will undertake this year. The system will be tested in March and will be rolled out to residents in April.

Other Emergency Preparedness plans include a power generator for the Aquatic and Community Centre which will serve as a shelter for residents in case of disaster, emergency radio communications volunteers, training programs for City staff, educating residents in disaster readiness and establishment of a Community Emergency Response Team. The generator will cost approximately $650,000.

Tres actif pour vôtre sécurité

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I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL - J'ai amené l'idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL – J’ai amené l’idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

Mon portefeuille au conseil municipal est celui de la Protection civile et des Transports, et c’est pourquoi je suis à la tête du Comité des services d’urgence qui assure les meilleurs services possible à notre communauté. Comme cette responsabilité est associée aux activités du Service de protection civile regroupant les Services médicaux d’urgence (SMU), la Sécurité publique et Citoyens en patrouille (vCOP), je travaille de près avec son directeur, Jordy Reichson, et j’ai des contacts fréquents avec le commandant Marc Cournoyer du poste de quartier 9 de la Police.

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

En tant que président du Comité de planification des catastrophes, je travaille en coulisse avec tous les services afin de protéger les résidants de Côte Saint-Luc en cas de catastrophe majeure.

Bien que les SMU sont ma passion, un autre secteur d’activité où mes interventions ont un impact sur la vie quotidienne des résidants est le travail du Comité des transports que je préside également. À ce titre, j’ai piloté plusieurs initiatives axées sur la sécurité des piétons, comme nos panneaux installés au centre de la rue pour les passages piétonniers, le marquage des rues pour les limites de vitesse, et les trottoirs élargis aux intersections.

Street line markings and bollards narrow the width of Einstein Avenue resulting in slower traffic patterns

Street line markings and bollards narrow the width of Einstein Avenue resulting in slower traffic patterns

En tant que fondateur de vCOP, j’ai eu l’occasion de travailler avec des membres extraordinaires de notre communauté pour mettre sur pied un groupe de bénévoles en mesure de raviver notre sens de la sécurité communautaire et qui sont disponibles en cas de situations d’urgence de grande ampleur. Après seulement sept ans d’activité, vCOP est un succès retentissant, le premier projet du genre au Québec. Plus de 80 bénévoles ont reçu la formation nécessaire pour patrouiller dans les rues et les parcs de la ville tous les jours et pour aider au besoin en attendant l’arrivée des services d’urgence.

More visible crosswalks, like this one on Mackle and Einstein, will be the new norm near parks, playgrounds, schools and busy intersections in Cote Saint-Luc

More visible crosswalks, like this one on Mackle and Einstein, will be the new norm near parks, playgrounds, schools and busy intersections in Cote Saint-Luc

Votre conseil municipal et moi sommes pour vous le niveau de représentation le plus proche des citoyens – facilement accessibles pour vous et toujours attentifs à vos besoins. Je vous invite à me faire part de vos préoccupations et de vos suggestions.

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Passion for public safety

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Councillor Glenn J. Nashen on duty with vCOP

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen on duty last night with vCOP

Cote Saint-Luc public safety and emergency preparedness.  It’s what I love to do for my city and its residents.

Yesterday afternoon I convened our city’s Emergency Preparedness Committee (EPC) meeting. This committee is made up of expert staff in emergency preparedness from our local and regional emergency services along with our partners from the CLSC/CSSS, CP Rail, Montreal Civil Protection office along with a resident representative, expert consultants and city administration and elected officials.  I have headed up this committee since 1990 and we oversee the development and updating of the municipal emergency preparedness plan.

Ask anyone in emergency preparedness and they’ll tell you it’s not a question of “if” something will go terribly wrong – it’s just a matter of “when” the disaster will strike. With this in mind, we are always working on our plan which is quite comprehensive and has been updated and tested several times since I was appointed chair, when first elected.

The meeting included a briefing by CSL Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson who recently attended the World Conference on Disaster Management. The information he acquired is invaluable to our residents as we upgrade and test our plan, educate our residents and promote a culture of safety and preparedness.

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

No sooner did this meeting start that I was receiving an urgent message from the Jewish General Hospital, where I serve as a senior director, for an emergency within the facilities that needed immediate attention.  Back to the EPC for more discussion on community engagement and developing a culture of preparedness.  Much of this centred around the excellent initiative known as 72 Hours, produced by the national Minister of Public Safety.

After a quick bite for dinner I donned my orange polo top and out I went for a shift with the city’s volunteer Citizens on Patrol (vCOP).  I launched this group back in 2006, the first of its kind in Quebec.

It is a rewarding and gratifying experience to spend a few hours patrolling our city, on the lookout for anything offbeat that should be reported to police or public security, or to be waved down by a resident asking for information or assistance.

Visiting the Vancouver Emergency Operations Centre

Visiting the Vancouver Emergency Operations Centre

Last night, the severe thundershower left many residents in District 5 without power for about three hours. As we circulated through their neighbourhood in our marked van, crisscrossing with one of two other vCOP vans on patrol at the same time, we felt a sense of relief from the many residents seeking cool comfort on their front balcony as we offered at least some security that someone was around if they needed some help.

EMS_832

We are fortunate in Cote Saint-Luc to have this culture of safety and security at all levels of our civil administration and indeed throughout the community.  I’m very pleased to have played a major role in instilling this philosophy in our city with the creation of our EMS and vCOP, as well as doing my very particular part by going on patrol when I can to meet with our volunteers and our residents.

We’re indeed fortunate as we live in the safest corner of the Island of Montreal, by design and through years of planning.

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

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