Tres actif pour vôtre sécurité

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I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL - J'ai amené l'idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL – J’ai amené l’idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

Mon portefeuille au conseil municipal est celui de la Protection civile et des Transports, et c’est pourquoi je suis à la tête du Comité des services d’urgence qui assure les meilleurs services possible à notre communauté. Comme cette responsabilité est associée aux activités du Service de protection civile regroupant les Services médicaux d’urgence (SMU), la Sécurité publique et Citoyens en patrouille (vCOP), je travaille de près avec son directeur, Jordy Reichson, et j’ai des contacts fréquents avec le commandant Marc Cournoyer du poste de quartier 9 de la Police.

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

Community leaders and Public Security officials meet with Police

En tant que président du Comité de planification des catastrophes, je travaille en coulisse avec tous les services afin de protéger les résidants de Côte Saint-Luc en cas de catastrophe majeure.

Bien que les SMU sont ma passion, un autre secteur d’activité où mes interventions ont un impact sur la vie quotidienne des résidants est le travail du Comité des transports que je préside également. À ce titre, j’ai piloté plusieurs initiatives axées sur la sécurité des piétons, comme nos panneaux installés au centre de la rue pour les passages piétonniers, le marquage des rues pour les limites de vitesse, et les trottoirs élargis aux intersections.

Street line markings and bollards narrow the width of Einstein Avenue resulting in slower traffic patterns

Street line markings and bollards narrow the width of Einstein Avenue resulting in slower traffic patterns

En tant que fondateur de vCOP, j’ai eu l’occasion de travailler avec des membres extraordinaires de notre communauté pour mettre sur pied un groupe de bénévoles en mesure de raviver notre sens de la sécurité communautaire et qui sont disponibles en cas de situations d’urgence de grande ampleur. Après seulement sept ans d’activité, vCOP est un succès retentissant, le premier projet du genre au Québec. Plus de 80 bénévoles ont reçu la formation nécessaire pour patrouiller dans les rues et les parcs de la ville tous les jours et pour aider au besoin en attendant l’arrivée des services d’urgence.

More visible crosswalks, like this one on Mackle and Einstein, will be the new norm near parks, playgrounds, schools and busy intersections in Cote Saint-Luc

More visible crosswalks, like this one on Mackle and Einstein, will be the new norm near parks, playgrounds, schools and busy intersections in Cote Saint-Luc

Votre conseil municipal et moi sommes pour vous le niveau de représentation le plus proche des citoyens – facilement accessibles pour vous et toujours attentifs à vos besoins. Je vous invite à me faire part de vos préoccupations et de vos suggestions.

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Ambulance strike off, for now

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This Urgences Santé ambulance spotted on Cote des Neiges Road Friday afternoon was readied for strike actions that were called off at the last moment

Urgences Sante ambulance paramedics were set to go on strike this weekend but this action was called off at the last minute.  Ambulances were already defaced with stickers by disgruntled union activists by Friday afternoon despite the strike being called off.

By law, ambulance service is considered essential and therefore the would-be strike action is limited to administrative delays, defacing property and not wearing uniforms, for example.  But delays in service is a possibility as evidenced by previous strike activity.

Nevertheless, Cote Saint-Luc’s volunteer Emergency Medical Services is always at the ready to respond to emergency calls as the authorized first responder service of this city.  EMS responds to Priority 1 (life threatening) and 3 (potentially life threatening) calls unlike the rest of the Island of Montreal where the Montreal Fire Department responds to Priority 1 only, when available.

EMS has ben known to respond to multiple emergencies at the same time.  With a fleet of three emergency first responder vehicles and some volunteers even equipped with radios and gear in their personal vehicles EMS has been able to answer as many as four emergency situations at the same time.  This is incredible service to those in Cote Saint-Luc and any strike action by ambulance technicians in the future would result in several volunteers being available to tend to the sick or injured while awaiting ambulance response.

Bravo to our dedicated and talented EMS volunteers.

Côte St. Luc a livable, innovative community

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Côte St. Luc a livable, innovative community

Largely residential city has strong education, recreation facilities

 

BY MEGAN MARTIN, FREELANCE, The Montreal Gazette, FEBRUARY 1, 2012

 

Côte St. Luc is a bilingual municipality with a diverse population, located west of the downtown core. Featuring ideal real estate for families, the largely residential city is the third largest municipality on the island of Montreal. The town was incorporated in 1903 and graduated to city status in 1958.

 

The city’s population of roughly 32,500 is spread over 6.95 square kilometres of land. There are around 13,500 households on the territory, divided almost equally between owned and rented properties. A mayor and eight city councillors administer the city, each for a term of four years. Each councillor serves a separate district of the city.

 

INNOVATION

 

Côte St. Luc has been a leader in health and safety issues, becoming one of the first municipalities in Quebec to ban pesticides. It was also the first municipality in Quebec to outlaw smoking in public places and to require bicycle helmets. Additionally, Côte St. Luc is the only community in Quebec to have a volunteer first responder service, which was created almost 30 years ago. And in 2006, it became the first city in the province to launch a Citizens on Patrol program.

 

SCHOOLS

 

There is no shortage of schools at a variety of academic levels in Côte St. Luc. Moreover, because of the large Jewish population in the city, there are several private, specialized schools. Preschools include the Hebrew Day School on Hudson Ave., and the Jewish People’s and Peretz School on Westminster Ave. Elementary schools include École Maimonides located on Côte St. Luc Rd., Hebrew Academy on Kellert St., Merton Elementary on Robinson Ave., École de la Mosaique on McMurray Ave., and Yeshiva Yavne on Wavell Rd. There are also several high schools in Côte St. Luc including École Secondaire Maimonide on Parkhaven Ave., Bialik High School on Kildare Ave., and Hebrew Academy on Kellert Ave. Lastly, Marymount Adult Centre and John Grant High School for children with special needs share a building on Parkhaven Ave.

 

RECREATION

 

The sports and recreation programs offered by Côte St. Luc make it an attractive residential community, especially for families. The Parks and Recreation Department in Côte St. Luc offers residents various leisure, sporting, and cultural programs. It coordinates events year round and runs facilities such as the Samuel Moskovitch Arena.

 

The city boasts 28 parks and a brand new Aquatic and Community Centre on Parkhaven Ave. The new centre, which opened in September 2011, was created to offer residents access to resources geared toward leading an active and healthy lifestyle. The centre features an indoor competition pool and a separate recreation pool, which provides a year-round venue for a range of aquatic activities, a fitness room for aerobic conditioning and a dance studio.

 

There is also a teen lounge on site, a satellite library, a game room, kids’ zone and babysitting service available. The venue also offers large, rentable rooms including a catering kitchen for events such as conferences and parties.

 

In addition, the Eleanor London Côte St. Luc Public Library is widely regarded for its services. The library contains roughly 231,365 books for children and adults, and stocks thousands of videos, DVDs, audiobooks, periodicals and music. The library is so popular, in fact, that an average of 1,144 items are taken out on a daily basis.

 

CÔTE ST. LUC HUMAN RIGHTS WALKWAY

 

The Côte St. Luc Human Rights Walkway was established in 2000 in Pierre Elliott Trudeau Park. The Walkway honours men and women who have, throughout history, been dedicated to the advancement of human rights. It is an attraction and historical monument unique to Côte St. Luc.

 

HEALTH CARE

 

The city has the advantage of being mere minutes away from a major health care institution: the Jewish General Hospital on Côte Sainte-Catherine Rd. Moreover, Mount Sinai Hospital, which specializes in respiratory, palliative, and long-term care, is located on Cavendish Ave. Also on Cavendish Ave. is CLSC René-Cassin; and the Donald Berman Maimonides Geriatric Centre is on Caldwell Ave. There are also many small health clinics throughout the city.

 

© Copyright (c) The Montreal Gazette

 

 

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/C%c3%b4te+livable+innovative+community/6082288/story.html#ixzz1l8qD8ip8

30 Years of Volunteering in Cote Saint-Luc’s emergency services

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This month marks my 30th anniversary since first joining the Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Measures Organization (Emergency Medical Services or EMS since the mid 80s).

In 1979, fresh out of Bialik High School, I attended Vanier College during the day to complete my regular CEGEP program.  During the evening,  Ruth Kovac and I studied in Dawson College’s Emergency Medical Technician program under master instructor Gary McHugh.

8100 Cote Saint-Luc Road through the years: Home of CSL's first mayor, Luc Prud'homme, Police Station, Fire Station, Recreation Department, Senior Men's Club, Emergency Measures Organization, Emergency Medical Services, Public Security Department, Public Safety headquarters

8100 Cote Saint-Luc Road through the years: Home of CSL's first mayor, Luc Prud'homme, Police Station, Fire Station, Recreation Department, Senior Men's Club, Emergency Measures Organization, Emergency Medical Services, Public Security Department, Public Safety headquarters

EMO ran out of 8100 Cote Saint-Luc Road.  This heritage building was the home of the first mayor of Cote Saint-Luc, Luc Prud’homme.  Later it became the police station and fire station.  A holding cell is still in the basement and the stable out back, torn down in the 80s, housed the horses that raced to fires with water containers in tow.

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Measures Organization, 1981

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Measures Organization, 1983

Back then, EMO was lead by Brian Payne along with Norm Adler.  Jack Dym served as Chief of Operations.  Erwin Luden was involved in Auxilairy Security.  Several hundred, perhaps over 1000 young adults have passed through these doors and have gone on to many different professions. Several went on to become doctors, nurses, and medical technicians. 

EMO sparked my interest in local politics with an eye toward improving and expanding this service as well as other local emergency services.

EMO's RMF-11 (for Rescue, Medical, Fire) was a copy of the vehicles from the 80s TV series "Emergency"

1983 photo of EMO's RMF-11 (for Rescue, Medical, Fire) was a copy of the vehicle from the 70s TV series "Emergency"

 

In 1979 EMO received its calls directly from residents or from private ambulance companies that were stationed in Lasalle, NDG or elsewhere in Montreal.  Our response vehicle, RMF-11 (for Rescue-Medical-Fire) was a copy of the one used on the 1970s hit-TV series “Emergency”.  We wore brown coveralls with a yellow stripe, carried an official Cote Saint-Luc “Rescue” badge and wore either police type cap or a fire helmet.  At night, we would sleep on army cots waiting for the phone to ring.

Our training was excellent back then, as it is today.  In addition to the medical education we also learned light rescue techniques: how to repel off the side of a building and how to lower a victim in a stokes basket.  We practiced off the roof at 8100 and at the tennis court building on Guelph near Wentworth, when it used to be a pump house.

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

 We learned how to march in unison and paraded each year in the Remembrance Day Parade from the CSL Shopping Centre to the cenotaph (now Father Martin Foley Park) between the Fire Station and the Post Office.

Much has changed in 30 years and I am fortunate to have been involved in just about every major decision concerning first responders and emergency preparedness ever since. 

We fell under the Urgences Santé system back in 1982 when the ambulance companies were brought under a single communications and operational command.  This was before 9-1-1 was launched in Montreal.

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Urgences Santé and Jeff Silver (in brown coveralls) with EMO

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Urgences Santé and Jeff Silver (in brown coveralls) with EMO

My wonderful memories and experiences will last a lifetime, thanks to the CSL EMO and EMS.  It shaped my interest in community, influenced my professional career path and launched my political life.  My story has repeated hundreds of times for so many other young people who went through this program, and our community has been strengthened because of it.  And residents have been comforted and lives have been saved for more than 30 years.

Cote Saint-Luc EMO launched my side-career as an Urgences-Santé ambulance technician in 1980

Cote Saint-Luc EMO launched my side-career as an Urgences-Santé ambulance technician in 1980

  

My EMO involvement also led to 5 years of volunteer service on the Canadian Ski Patrol.  I rose to the level of Assistant Patrol Leader at Mont Alta in Ste-Agathe.

My EMO involvement also led to 5 years of volunteer service on the Canadian Ski Patrol. I rose to the level of Assistant Patrol Leader at Mont Alta in Ste-Agathe. This is a picture of me bringing an injured skier down the hill on toboggan.

CSL Courier: October 2008 message

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This mandate has been the culmination of a David vs. Goliath epic saga. We battled to save our city, then our police station, our fire station and finally our Emergency Medical Services! They tried to take away each of these but when we fought back we won each and every time. Saving EMS is an absolute high point since being elected to council in 1990. Our renowned volunteer first responders, which I joined right out of high school in 1979, are proven life savers and we are so very fortunate to have them remain in our city!
You can support our EMS Lifesavers Fund, helping to defray the cost of training our volunteers and provide incentives for round-the-clock coverage. Your donation is tax deductible. Please make your cheque payable to the “City of CSL EMS Lifesavers Fund”.

We are constantly looking for new volunteers to join EMS as well as our volunteer Citizens on Patrol. Please help us recruit a few good residents.

Let’s remember to slow down near schools and parks where the speed limit is 30 km/h. Police are ticketing speeders and Public Security will enforce parking restrictions. Watch out for pedestrians and don’t stop in crosswalks. Teach young kids to safely cross the street and young drivers to respect all rules of the road. We are all responsible for road safety.

We are finally seeing a rejuvenation of our outdated playground equipment, part of our effort to attract and serve young families. New street signs will also help to spruce up our neighbourhoods.  And major efforts are underway at reducing garbage though new and innovative waste management initiatives to benefit us and future generations.

Norwalk Rd. residents had asked me to get rid of the unsightly bins next to the CSL Seniors Garden and they have indeed been removed. Shalom Ave. residents asked to slow traffic on Mackle Rd. and we are now testing new speed cushions in addition to the centre-of-the-road crosswalk signs I recommended. These signs are having a positive impact across District 6 and throughout our city.

When you change your clock back this fall remember to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors (you must have at least one on every floor but for extra safety put one in every bedroom).  CPR courses are now offered at the Parks and Recreation Department. Do your loved ones a favour and get trained!

To contact Councillor Glenn J. Nashen, call 514-485-6945 or send an e-mail message to gjnashen@cotesaintluc.org.