A tough commute in Montreal may eventually be a thing of the past

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On a morning where my  12 minute commute took over an hour I’m inspired to share this lecture from the Consumer Electronics Show going on in Las Vegas about Smart Cities. It speaks to the democratization of transportation whereby all vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians are linked to one another.

Congestion can be mitigated by connectivity and data sharing. The whole system needs to be made more intelligent. Cities need to get connected to new technology and use data to manage traffic flow and to improve citizens’ quality of life, local business, the environment and even public safety.
In this conference, Ford Motor Company’s President and CEO Jim Hackett focuses on mobility solutions as the world progresses toward smarter cities. Ford’s vision is to become the world’s most trusted mobility company, designing smart vehicles for a smart world.
I hope our friends and neighbours from the Cote des Neiges – NDG Borough Hall also take note about smarter cities and avoid blocking Van Horne for snow clearing during rush hour, resulting today in gridlock across Snowdon West, Hampstead and Cote Saint-Luc.
Speaking of Hampstead, please clear BOTH lanes on Fleet. 1.5 lanes of snow clearing doesn’t really help the flow.
And kudos to the CSL Public Works Department under the leadership of Director Bebe Newman. Bebe’s crews practically catch the snow before it hits the ground. You’d never know that 36 centimetres fell in CSL driving down its main streets today.

Making CSL streets safer by limiting truck traffic

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At the September 11, 2017 Public council Meeting the City Council notice was given for a new truck route in order to regulate traffic in Côte Saint-Luc.

According to the Highway Safety Code, a By-Law regulating the traffic of trucks must be approved by the Minister of Transport. Once approved, trucks and tool vehicle traffic will be permitted on Cavendish Boulevard and Côte Saint-Luc Road as well as on all streets throughout the City for local deliveries.

Côte Saint-Luc will also request that all neighbouring cities adopt a similar resolution in support of this new regulation.

This new By-Law will improve the flow of traffic on Fleet Road which is not capable of handling trailer trucks. It will also keep trucks mainly on our two major boulevards and off our side streets as much as possible. Of course, local deliveries will always be permitted.

As the councillor responsible for the Pedestrian and Traffic Safety dossier I was pleased to give notice for this motion. Safety and security has always been my primary focus as City Councillor and any ideas to keep pedestrians safe and vehicles moving at a safe speed are always welcomed and reviewed with our traffic engineers.

 

Excessive number of stop signs in Hampstead contribute to pollution: Letter to Suburban Newspaper

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The following is a letter to the editor to the Suburban from District 6 resident Leslie Satenstein, my most notable commentor on this blog. Leslie makes the point that municipalities have a responsibility to safeguard the environment through strategic traffic planning (while ensuring pedestrian and motorist safety, no doubt).

I have written extensively about Fleet Road in this blog. Search “Fleet”.

 

  • Suburban Newspaper, Aug 16, 2017
  •  0

For what seems a century, or at least since 1985 when I moved to Cote Saint Luc, I have had the annoyance and been angered at the number of Hampstead stop signs along VanHorne/Fleet.

Bringing a car to a “stop sign” emits brake pad and tire dust, Average acceleration of a vehicle from a stop sign consumes a quarter of a teaspoon of gasoline per vehicle.

Given the stop signs are for each direction, you can be assure that daily, several tens of gallons of spent gasoline are emitted into the air. We know the importance of fresh air. In this short strip of the route to the borders of Cote Saint Luc, Hampstead’s contribution is one of being a major co-polluter. I call Hampstead’s lack of a remedy, shameful.

One could say, “Big deal, Hampstead’s pollution is the cost of living in CSL” and Cote Saint Luc should cover any remedy costs. That is a consideration for cost sharing.

I look at the luxury homes built on either side of the stop signs, and you will note “the owners can’t use the front of the house, and they cannot leave open, a window for fresh air”. For the residents of those homes, use of the front of the house is limited to receive mail and the Suburban, and to provide access to the car garage, nothing more.

In my high-school years, I lived at a similar intersection. The tire-dust that would settle on the front stoop, on the front window ledges was substantial. Daily, if you swiped your hands across a “early morning cleaned” surface, you would find you palm coated with black tire-dust. During periods of bumper-to-bumper traffic, the smell of spent fuel was horrific.

Mayor Steinberg prides himself on technology. When is Hampstead going to invest, as did Town of Mount-Royal, on installing synchronized traffic lights. A vehicle that travels at a fixed speed and does not brake and accelerate emits much much less combined pollution.

I would be very very interested to know the health claims made by the and former residents living in proximity to those intersections. Start from the year 1985.

Hampstead, it’s time to do something.

Leslie Satenstein

Montreal

CSL Mayor on first 100 days in office

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Cote Saint-Luc Mayor Mitchell Brownstein gives a quick update on his first 100 days in office and on latest developments on Fleet Road, Cavendish extension, CP Rail, city events and staying in close contact with constituents.

Fleet to flow at 40 km/h

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speedlimit40

Cote Saint-Luc and Hampstead have agreed to harmonize the speed along Fleet in both towns to 40 km/h and to enhance the signage and street line marking at crosswalks. This cooperative project is aimed at ensuring greater safety of pedestrians.

Currently, the speed varies between 50 km/h in CSL to 50 km/h and 30 km/h in Hampstead.

Hampstead and CSL will install 40 km/h speed limit signs on Fleet between Cavendish and Dufferin Road on their respective territories. The cities will also collaborate to do their utmost to ensure that the traffic lights on Fleet Road, on their respective territories, are synchronized.

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013a    No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013b

They will also work together to create a simplified plan as related to the wording on the signs for the no left turn policy on the streets running perpendicular to Fleet Road, namely, Netherwood, Finchley, Dufferin Road. This has been a serious source of frustration for motorists from both cities, many of whom have been ticketed for turning left off of Fleet, unable to decipher the confusing signage. The confusing road signs were also cited by a Montreal Court judge in dismissing a ticket to a Hampstead motorist (posted elsewhere on this blog).

Free Press, May 23. 2012

Free Press, May 23. 2012

Hampstead has also agreed to provide greater visibility for the unprotected cross walk between Queen Mary Road and Netherwood.

This synchronization plan is good news for West End motorists, cyclists and pedestrians alike. While Fleet is not wide enough for a dedicated bike lane the slower traffic will improve the safety of those on bikes and walking across the street. It is intended that crosswalks will be even more visible by better street line markings and signage will be installed in high visibility colours.

As the one who called for the initial meeting to discuss this project with Hampstead Mayor Steinberg I am very pleased with the cooperation between our two municipalities. Councillor Dida Berku and I along with CSL Urban Development Director Charles Senekal met with Mayor Steinberg and members of his administration last winter to discuss common concerns and ideas to reduce risk.

Two weeks ago I met again with Mayor Steinberg, CSL Mayor Mitchell Brownstein and members of council along with CDN-NDG Mayor Russell Copeman and Councillor Marvin Rotrand at the Federation of Canadian Municipalities in Winnipeg. We had a productive working meeting where we touched upon the Fleet –  Van Horne corridor among other subjects. Copeman and Rotrand are also open to the idea of synchronizing Van Horne between Hampstead and Decarie to 40 km/h as well.

Safer at 40 km/h speed sign

In addition I’ve asked Councillor Rotrand to have his staff repair the significant depressions in the roadway on Van Horne to ensure a steady flow of two lanes of traffic during rush hour and to have police enforce the no stopping regulation which often causes a bottleneck, blocking the flow of traffic and the 161 bus.

Thank you to the three municipal administraions and especially mayors Steinberg, Copeman and Brownstein for demonstrating a genuine interest in cooperation and collaboration.

Do you have ideas to improve this thoroughfare? Please share your ideas here.

Hampstead reduces the already slow flow on Fleet

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New speed sign on Fleet Road in Hamsptead, partially obscured by a tree, with French only "New Signage" notice

New speed sign on Fleet Road in Hampstead, partially obscured by a tree, with French only “New Signage” notice

As if the congestion along Fleet Road in Hampstead and deliberately confusing No Left Turn signs weren’t enough the town has erected new speed signs effectively lowering the limit from 50 km/h to a mere 30 km/h.

Since 2011 the Town of Hampstead has thrown logic to the wind and rolled out an amateurish improvisation in traffic control measures essentially penalizing motorists who cut through the town between Cote Saint-Luc and Decarie.

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A series of nonsensical No Left Turn signs (see my prior blog postings on “Chelmstead” here) sprang up that lead to confusion and frustration to any motorist without advanced math skills or a mobile abacus. That was the left hook (or should I say No Left)?

Next police cars from Station 9 appeared, nabbing unsuspecting motorists, who dared the illegal left maneuver, diabolically calculated in 15 minute intervals.

In 2013, a Montreal municipal court judge threw out an infraction issued to Côte Saint-Luc resident Alissa Sklar, who was ticketed for turning left from eastbound Fleet at 8:05 a.m.

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The Suburban reported that Hampstead’s many eastbound Fleet left-turn prohibition signs have received mixed reviews, with some motorists saying they are confusing and the print on the signs specifying prohibition times is too small.

“I said to the judge, “I have a doctorate and I would like to think I’m at least reasonable and intelligent,’” Sklar told The Suburban. “I told him I drive on Fleet from time to time, and I was aware of how confusing these signs are. I had to get to a street in Hampstead north of Fleet, and I was kind of paralyzed by indecision.”

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013a

“I showed the judge the other signs, which said ‘except.’ The judge went through it with me, and the whole time, the prosecutor for the city was laughing her head off. She obviously agreed the whole thing was ridiculous.”

Sklar said the judge examined each of the signs, and appeared to be “clearly puzzled.”

“The judge said ‘I don’t know what it means.’ He gave it to the prosecutor and she was laughing and said, ‘I don’t have a single thing to say about these signs. The only thing I should say is I should stay off Fleet Road myself.’”

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013d

 

 

At the time, Mayor William Steinberg said “However, the left turn restrictions have been in effect for over two years and the result is much less traffic going through our residential streets north of Fleet.” “Before the restrictions, residents on many streets had a very hard time backing out of their driveways in the morning due to the volume of morning rush hour traffic. Councillor Harvey Shaffer gets credit for coming up with a solution that spread the pain and also reduced the overall volume of traffic turning left off of Fleet. “Long term, opening Cavendish is the best solution for reducing traffic on Fleet.”

I said it right here when these ridiculous signs went up five years ago. I would not pay such a fine. I’d also take it to court as these bizarre and confusing signs would never stand before a judge.

Next came an unprotected crosswalk, nothing short of a dangerous passage that I would never allow my child to use. Sure enough a serious accident causing injury was eventually reported on by the Suburban, CTV News and Global News.

Free Press, May 23. 2012

Free Press, May 23. 2012

Having run out of senseless pseudo-traffic calming measures the town has erected 30km/h signs on Fleet just yesterday, east of Queen Mary Road. Presumably, the rationale is due to Hampstead Park, abutting this section of the major thoroughfare. However, most of the length of the park adjacent to the road is home to a dog run which is entirely fenced in. The very small length along Fleet not fenced in is a long distance from the playing fields, playground and community centre.

Incidentally, Hampstead lawyer and language rights crusader Harold Staviss will have fun asking why the new sign notice posted by the bilingual town is in French only.

New signage erected Jan. 12, 2016, next to dog run on Fleet

New signage erected Jan. 12, 2016, next to dog run on Fleet

What’s worse, there is no 50km/h sign further east along Fleet Road. According to the Quebec Highway Code vehicles may not return to a higher speed unless an appropriate sign indicating the higher speed follows. As well, it will be interesting to find out if the town sought permission to change the speed on this major artery, as required by Minister of Transport regulations.

Get ready for the next police crackdown of mainly Cote Saint-Luc motorists for travelling 35km/h in a 30 zone when their not calculating if left turns are permitted presuming they’re not already stopped at an unprotected crosswalk!

Full disclosure: I genuinely like my neighbouring members of council and mayor from Hampstead. They are all affable individuals who, I’m sure, want the best for their town. But folks, please give us a break!

 

Left turn restrictions on Fleet in CSL explained

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From Squeaky Wheels, Montreal Gazette, July 5, 2015

Q: Throughout Montreal and other municipalities rush hour is generally 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. During these four hours, traffic is forced to avoid left turns because of the higher volumes. This is understandable. Why does the city of Côte-St-Luc designate rush hour 7-10 a.m. and 3-7 p.m., a total of 7 hours compared with 4 hours? This is on Fleet, which is the only route in and out of Côte-St-Luc

Isaac Alt, Côte-St-Luc

A: Côte-St-Luc spokesperson Darryl Levine said the extended rush periods are a relatively new occurrence. Before that, Côte Saint-Luc didn’t allow left turns on Fleet Rd. from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. This was to avoid traffic delays on Fleet Rd. during rush hour and to stop motorists from using the side streets as shortcuts during the rest of the day, Levine said.
However, by 2010 the city concluded this extended left-turn restriction was having unintended consequences, because vehicles were finding other ways around and this created traffic on smaller side streets. In 2010, after a consultation with residents, the city decided to introduce the current rush-period restrictions. This was seen as striking a good balance between people who wanted to turn off of Fleet, and the residents on those streets that didn’t want through traffic in front of their homes.
“Having an extended rush hour time period means two hours of less traffic on the side streets in the immediate area,” Levine said. “So those streets now get more vehicles than in 2010, but less than if the would have if the rush hour left turn restriction had been made shorter.”

No changes to Fleet signage: Hamsptead

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May 15, 2015 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

May 15, 2015 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

More on the confusing traffic signs on Fleet Road in Hampstead which is nothing short of entrapment.

 

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Fleet left-hand turn signage criticized by resident

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Nov. 11, 2014 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

Nov. 11, 2014 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

 

Court throws out Hampstead ‘confusing’ left-turn ticket

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Suburban Newspaper, Joel Goldenberg, June 11th, 2014

 

A Montreal municipal court judge has thrown out an infraction issued in June of last year to Côte St. Luc resident Alissa Sklar, who was ticketed for turning left from eastbound Fleet onto the eastern tip of Netherwood Crescent at 8:05 a.m.

Hampstead’s many eastbound Fleet left-turn prohibition signs have received mixed reviews, with some motorists saying they are confusing and the print on the signs specifying prohibition times is too small.

The Netherwood intersection has a no left-turn sign, and specifically prohibits left turns from 7 to 7:30 a.m. and from 7:45 to 9 a.m. Monday to Friday. At Finchley, there is a straight arrow sign, but a motorist is allowed to turn left during a 15-minute period, from 8 to 8:15 a.m. Monday to Friday.

“I said to the judge, “I have a doctorate and I would like to think I’m at least reasonable and intelligent,’” Sklar told The Suburban last week. “I told him I drive on Fleet from time to time, and I was aware of how confusing these signs are. I had to get to a street in Hampstead north of Fleet, and I was kind of paralyzed by indecision.”

Sklar said she told the judge the Netherwood intersection sign was especially confusing.

“I showed the judge the other signs, which said ‘except.’ The judge went through it with me, and the whole time, the prosecutor for the city was laughing her head off. She obviously agreed the whole thing was ridiculous.”

Sklar said the judge examined each of the signs, and appeared to be “clearly puzzled” by the Netherwood intersection sign.

“The judge said ‘I don’t know what it means.’ He gave it to the prosecutor and she was laughing and said, ‘I don’t have a single thing to say about these signs. The only thing I should say is I should stay off Fleet Road myself.’”

Mayor William Steinberg said he could not comment directly on the court’s decision as he was not present at the St. Laurent courthouse.

“However, the left turn restrictions have been in effect for over two years and the result is much less traffic going through our residential streets north of Fleet,” he said. “Before the restrictions, residents on many streets had a very hard time backing out of their driveways in the morning due to the volume of morning rush hour traffic. Councillor Harvey Shaffer gets credit for coming up with a solution that spread the pain and also reduced the overall volume of traffic turning left off of Fleet.

“Long term, opening Cavendish is the best solution for reducing traffic on Fleet.”

 

In my opinion: I said it right here when these ridiculous signs went up a couple of years ago. I would not pay such a fine. I’d also take it to court as these bizarre and confusing signs would never stand before a judge.

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013a

Photo Lewis Cohen

Good for Alissa Sklar who proved the point and showed that these signs are meant to baffle and scare motorists, mostly from CSL, into obeyance. Even the prosecutor laughed at Hampstead’s intentionally unclear road signs.

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013b

Photo Lewis Cohen

Mr. Mayor and Town Councillors. You’re all good people trying to do your best for your residents and for that you are to be commended. But these signs create confusion and even frighten motorists who are otherwise obedient, good drivers. Please take down these signs and let’s all work together, with CDN-NDG too, to ease congestion and aggravation along the Fleet-Van Horne corridor. This will require some cooperation and good faith from Montreal Councillor Marvin Rotrand to help out on the feeders to Decarie, on paving the horrible asphalt on Van Horne, and in working to improve the commute for thousands of our residents.

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013c

Photo Lewis Cohen

You be the judge. These are four no left turn signs at four consecutive intersections along Fleet Road in Hampstead. Imagine coming upon these signs in morning rush hour, cars right up your tail, bright sunshine or blinding snow and trying to figure out if you can, if you can’t, what time it is right at that moment, what to do if you’re four minutes late or two minutes early? What do you think about this? Please comment.

No_left_Fleet_Hampstead_2013d

Photo Lewis Cohen

Comment from CSL resident Lewis Cohen, who last year was ticketed $161 for making an illegal left turn a few minutes past the marked minutes on Fleet Road in Hampstead:

It’s close to impossible to read all the times when turning is (or is not) permitted while checking the current time with steady traffic right behind your rear bumper during rush hour with different signage at every intersection. Signage in Montreal so much clearer and simpler. Hampstead obviously never heard of the “kiss” principal – keep it simple – stupid.

Heaven forbid you accidentally turn ten minutes early or late as I did once, and you get a $ 161.00 ticket from SPVM hiding on a side street. It’s almost entrapment. Worst part is, these restrictions have nothing to do with safety whatsoever..

If you aren’t irritated enough with the lack of alternate routes through Hampstead during peak hours, you are often stuck in gridlock as their public works crews block one lane in each direction on Fleet for hours a day while flowers are planted, flower beds cleaned up, or removed in the fall.

If the tables were turned and Hampstead residents had to travel through CSL to go to work and return home and put up with this ludicrous signage and flower bed planting woes, I wonder if we would hear similar complaints from their residents and councilors.

So much for good neighbour policy.

CSL renews push to extend Cavendish

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In a unanimous resolution the City Council of Cote Saint-Luc tonight adopted a resolution, together with its suburban partners, calling for the Montreal Agglomeration to include $44 Million in its 2014 capital expenditure budget toward Phase 1 of the Cavendish-Royalmount-Cavendish link. The resolution falls in line with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre’s election promises (and we thank Mayor Coderre immensely for this position) to see the completion of this much-needed link between Cote Saint-Luc, Montreal, TMR and St. Laurent.

The resolution calls for the “optimal scenario” also known as the Cote Saint-Luc scenario, being an indirect link between the two dead ends of Cavendish, meaning rather than a straight line the link would connect to the new Hippodrome development in the Snowdon district as well as to the TMR scientific park.

The extension project has never been closer to reality despite 50 years of discussions. The responsibility to finally get the shovel in the ground lies with the City of Montreal acting on behalf of the Montreal Island Agglomeration.

This is good news for local commuters who need more efficient access to the West Island, the airport and to points north and north-east.

Even motorists who use Fleet Road will benefit by reducing the daily gridlock through Hampstead, further complicated by that town’s confusing left turn restrictions off of Fleet Road.

With the demolition of the Turcot interchange scheduled in the coming years we can expect a decade of traffic congestion across the West End and southern portion of Montreal. Cote Saint-Lucers and neighbouring residents will greatly benefit by quickly connecting toward the north and west, to Autoroutes 15, 13 and 40 and to Decarie. The route should also open up faster routes to the Metro system.

 

RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE REALIZATION OF THE CAVENDISH BOULEVARD EXTENSION PROJECT

 

WHEREAS the Cavendish Boulevard extension (the “Cavendish Extension”) is indicated within the 2008 Transport Plan of the City of Montreal (“MTL”);

 

WHEREAS the completion the Cavendish Extension is the responsibility of MTL (on behalf of the Montreal Island Agglomeration) (“Agglomeration”);

 

WHEREAS MTL conducted various studies (“the Studies”) regarding the Cavendish Extension between 2005 and 2007 which led to an optimal scenario (the “Scenario”);

 

WHEREAS the Scenario must currently be adjusted to reflect the new realities; in particular, the development of the Hippodrome site (the “Site”);

 

WHEREAS updating the Cavendish Extension must also consider collective and active transport in order to optimize the management of actual and future movement within this large sector;

 

WHEREAS the updating of the Cavendish Extension route must also consider the requirements associated within the presence of railway activities of CP and CN in particular, those with respect to security;

 

WHEREAS MTL, in respecting the requirements of the Deed of Cession (the “Deed”) concerning the Site, must proceed with an updating of the Studies analysing the new context of the Site as well as other projects that are earmarked for this sector (such as the Cité scientifique, the projet Triangle Namur/Jean-Talon and the reconfiguration of the Côte de Liesse access) and must also take into account the capacity of Decarie Boulevard (article 5.2.4. and article 6.2.4);

 

WHEREAS this requirement contained within the Deed necessitates revisiting the planning of the Cavendish Extension; a prerequisite that will permit the Cavendish Extension to be realized;

 

WHEREAS monies were earmarked in September of 2013 by the Montreal Agglomeration Council to update the Studies in view of allotting monies for the Cavendish Extension within the Agglomeration’s Capital Expenditure Budget (“CEP”);

 

WHEREAS an amount of forty-four million dollars ($44,000,000.00) must thus be allotted within the Agglomeration’s CEP pursuant to the requirements contained within the Deed by and between MTL and the Quebec Government (article 5.2.3);

 

It was

 

MOVED BY COUNCILLOR DIDA BERKU

SECONDED BY COUNCILLOR ALLAN J. LEVINE

 

AND RESOLVED:

 

“THAT the Cavendish Extension be realized on the basis of an optimal scenario and to adjust said scenario to the new realities (described above-herein);

 

THAT the Cavendish Extension be further realized by having the concerned parties strongly collaborate to ensure its efficiency and success;

 

 

THAT the aforementioned forty-four million dollars ($44,000,000.00) mentioned above herein be inscribed within the 2014 Capital Expenditure Program for the Agglomeration of Montreal;

 

THAT a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the Quebec Minister of Transport, Sylvain Gaudreault and be deposited at a Montreal Agglomeration Council Meeting.”

CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY

Partial Road Closure – Fleet Road

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road-closed-and-detour-signs

The Town of Hampstead will close the south lane of Fleet Road direction east between Queen Mary Road and Minden Street in Hampstead in order to replace a stone retainer wall. This partial closure begins Tuesday, October 15 and is expected to be completed by October 26, barring any unforeseen delays due to poor weather and other similar obstacles.

The partial road closure will be in effect Monday to Friday from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm in order to lessen the impact on rush hour traffic. The sidewalk will be closed to pedestrians from Oct. 15-26 at all times until the work is completed.

This work will impact commuters who use Fleet to access Decarie Blvd. outside of rush hour. Although Hampstead does not anticipate traffic problems, the town is encouraging commuters to use alternate routes to avoid delays.

The closure of Fleet is required to enable contractors to replace the stone retainer wall and plant vegetation efficiently and in a timely fashion that reduces the impact for commuters.

Fleet Road construction zone entering Hampstead

Police nabbing CSL motorists in Hampstead

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montreal_police_car

Hampstead’s maze of nonsensical traffic signs continue to frustrate many West End motorists, particularly Cote Saint-Lucers.

Today, for at least the third time in a month, the Montreal police traffic squad is handing out tickets to those who do not calculate the permissible turning times off of Fleet.

Motorists know just how confusing the contradictory signs placed by the Town of Hampstead can be.  Some intersections allow turning at various intervals (green circle signs) while others prohibit turning during other intervals (red circle signs).  The text size is also very small and text heavy.

Police officers hide their cars so that they cannot be seen when turning off of Fleet.  Some officers have been from the traffic division (cars bearing the number 60) while most have been from Station 9.

Hampstead residents have been on the hook too as some have been nabbed at Belsize and Netherwood where the sign forces motorists to turn toward Fleet rather than continuing straight, through Hamsptead’s side streets.

Hampstead forces motorists off it's side streets and back to Fleet (Belsize corner of Netherwood)

Hampstead forces motorists off its side streets and back to Fleet (Belsize corner of Netherwood)

As written previously on this blog this is nothing more than a frustrating game of entrapment by Hampstead with compliance by the Montreal Police.  I personally would fight such a ticket in court in hopes of having a judge quash the nonsensical maze of confusing signs which constitute a traffic hazard.

Use of a phone while driving is a no no.  How about use of a calculator while driving?

Read more:

Ire, ridicule greet Hampstead left-turn rule

Hydro work on Fleet to end, finally

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The urgent repair work by Hydro Quebec that has resulted in traffic snarls entering and exiting Cote Saint-Luc along Fleet road for several weeks will finally come to an end tomorrow.

Hydro reports that their work has finally wrapped up and concrete is being poured to replace the sidewalk and the road surface is being restored.  All lanes will return to normal with this construction completed ending weeks of frustrating tie ups and traffic jams.

This situation underscored the important need for the Cavendish extension.  Discussions continue among the suburban and Montreal mayors.

 

Update on Hydro Quebec work on Fleet Rd.

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City Communique:

 

Last week, the Hydro Quebec project on Fleet Rd. was put on hold when their sub-contractor discovered a ruptured high voltage cable in the excavation. The Quebec workplace health and safety board (CSST) ordered the work to stop until the situation has been fixed.

 

 

 

Work resumed on Wednesday, October 17, 2012. We have asked Hydro Quebec to make up lost time and they have agreed to add additional manpower in order to have all the work complete by November 30, 2012.

 

 

 

Also, we expect to be able to re-open an additional eastbound lane (towards Décarie Blvd.) by Monday, October 29, 2012.

Update on Hydro Quebec work on Fleet Rd..

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