Three cheers for CSL Public Safety teams

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The Public safety Team: Mayor and Council join the volunters from EMS and the Public Security Agents and Dispatchers for a festive gathering (Photo CSL Comms)

The Public safety Team: Mayor and Council join the volunteers from EMS and the Public Security Agents and Dispatchers for a festive gathering (Photo CSL Comms)

The Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Medical Services volunteers threw an impressive home-made dinner celebration for their volunteer corps along with the Public Security Agents and Emergency Dispatchers. The banquet hall at the Aquatic and Community Centre was the venue for a tasty buffet dinner, all of it cooked up by a volunteer team of amateur chefs that could have doubled for professional caterers.

The Public Safety Kitchen Crew: Mark Metivier (EMS Captain of Education), Robert Rousseau (Captain of Operations), Brandon Luden (Captain of Logistics), Christiane Poirier (Lieutenant of Education), Marvin Zwikler (Lieutenant of Operations), Eddy Afram (EMS member).

The Public Safety Kitchen Crew: Mark Metivier (EMS Captain of Education), Robert Rousseau (Captain of Operations), Brandon Luden (Captain of Logistics), Christiane Poirier (Lieutenant of Education), Marvin Zwikler (Lieutenant of Operations), Eddy Afram (EMS member).

The Luden family stands out as unique among our Public Safety family. Erwin Luden and I go way back to the days of the CSL Emergency Measure Organization. While I volunteered all my free time (and then some) to cover first responder shifts on our Rescue-Medical-Fire vehicle, Erwin gave freely of his time patrolling the streets in a green pickup truck as part of our Auxiliary Security Patrol. Dressed in brown uniforms with yellow stripes we were well-known and appreciated by the residents back then.

Now, fast forward 36 years and Luden is still surveying the city but now as a professional Public Security Agent with the power to enforce municipal bylaws and to issue contraventions for infractions (write tickets!).

Meanwhile, his two sons, Brandon and Jordan, are active volunteers at CSL EMS. Brandon has been around for several years holding officer positions. I’m sure Jordan will follow suit in this noble cause.

Cllr. Glenn J. Nashen with the Luden Men: Proud Public Security Agent Irwin Luden and EMS sons Brandon and Jordan.

Cllr. Glenn J. Nashen with the Luden Men: Proud Public Security Agent Erwin Luden and EMS sons Brandon and Jordan.

And, not to be outdone by her brothers, Gillian Luden has been serving in the IDF for the past year. Hopefully she’ll be back one day and choose between joining CSL Public Security or EMS! Clearly, Bernice, the Luden mom, has done some very good work in raising these kids (with Erwin doing the enforcement I’m sure!).

 

EMS volunteer Shelson Goldberg will soon celebrate his 29th anniversary of service. Pictured here with longtime medic and friend Hershey.

EMS volunteer Sheldon Goldberg will soon celebrate his 29th anniversary of service. Pictured here with longtime medic and friend Hershey Shaffer.

 

Sheldon Goldberg is no ordinary volunteer. Despite a family business to run, children to watch over and leadership responsibilities at Montreal’s Hatzolah rescue squad, Sheldon has been donning his CSL EMS uniform every week for an incredible 29 years.  way to go Shloime! Biz a hundred und tzvantzik!

Seasoned EMS volunteer Yvan Martinbault with Cllr. Ruth Kovac

Seasoned EMS volunteer Yvan Martinbault with Cllr. Ruth Kovac

Yvan Martinbault is a bailiff by day and a long serving CSL EMS medic by night. I worked for over a year with Yvan covering EMS shifts about eight years ago. He is a polished, skilled and calm medic who is dedicated to his pastime and to our residents. In his free time, Yvan has served on the Canadian Ski Patrol (my alma mater, where I served for five years as Assistant Patrol leader in Laurentian Division at Mont Alta). For the past many years Yvan has served on the local patrols at La Reserve and Mont-Graceau in St. Donat. Bravo Yvan.

These are just a few profiles of an otherwise great group of man and woman, each with an equally interesting story. I congratulate them all.

Cllr. Sam Goldbloom is responsible for EMS and Public Security along with Director Jordy Reichson and Chief Philippe Chateauvert.

Cllr. Sam Goldbloom is responsible for EMS and Public Security along with Director Jordy Reichson and Chief Philippe Chateauvert.

Mayor Mitchell Brownstein addressed the party-goers and said that we are all here as a large family, taking care of one another and supporting each other. “We cannot change the past, we cannot predict the future, but we can enjoy this moment, together, like one big family,” Brownstein said.

Cllr. Sam Goldbloom currently handles the Public Safety dossier on council overseeing EMS, Public Security and Emergency Communications, a position I have held almost uninterrupted (save for a brief Montreal merger) since 1990. I continue to oversee volunteer Citizens on Patrol and Emergency Preparedness. Cllr. Ruth Kovac has been involved in this area as well throughout the years.

Sam and I work closely with the dynamic duo of  Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson and Chief Philippe Chateauvert. Jordy and Philippe oversee 150 volunteers and a professional staff of about 20.

At this time of year it is a good opportunity to say thank you to all of these fine folk for doing their part in keeping Cote Saint-Lucers safe and secure. They’re patrolling our streets, watching over our property, helping us when needed most and ensuring that we continue to live in the best city around. Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah and Happy New Year to each of you. Un gros merci!

Natural gas leak disrupts central Cote Saint-Luc

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Emergency crews respond to natural gas leak at Parkhaven and Kildare in Cote Saint-Luc (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

Emergency crews respond to natural gas leak at Parkhaven and Kildare in Cote Saint-Luc (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

UPDATED Aug. 30, 2016 22:20

A ruptured natural gas line disrupted a normal, quiet afternoon in Cote Saint-Luc today. Just before 5:00 P.M. calls started coming in from residents in the area of Parkhaven and Kildare about the smell of gas. I was passing the intersection of Cavendish and Kildare at 5:00 P.M. and noticed the distinct rotten-egg sulfuric smell. Emergency services were called and began arriving moments later.

CSL volunteer Citizens o Patrol maintain perimeter around gas leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

CSL volunteer Citizens o Patrol maintain perimeter around gas leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

Cote Saint-Luc Public Safety Director was one of the first on scene and quickly dispatched his Public Security agents to close off the area and evacuate residents within close proximity to the construction site at Kildare and Parkhaven.

As close as we can safely get to the scene of the leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

As close as we can safely get to the scene of the leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

CSL volunteer Citizens on Patrol was also activated and several teams quickly responded to assist in securing a perimeter to safeguard the immediate sector for several responding Montreal Fire Department vehicles. Police services also responded along with an Urgences Santé supervisor and CSL Emergency Medical Services. Within a short while Gaz Met crews also showed up on scene to assess the situation. Hydro Quebec emergency crews showed up and began cutting power to the immediate area and as far west as Blossom Ave.

vCOP detour traffic off of Kildare onto Wildwood (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

vCOP detour traffic off of Kildare onto Wildwood (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

By 6:30 P.M. I saw some fire crews leaving the area. By 7:30 P.M. some power was returning to the outer perimeter.

At 9:30 P.M. Gaz Met capped the leak and the fire department has begun house to house inspections. Once complete the road will be reopened and Hydro Quebec crews will be able to restore power.

As of 10:20 P.M. all power and water are reported to have been restored.

 

Gaz leak Parkhaven Kildare Photo Sidney Benizri 2016-08-30 006

CSL personnel and senior management were on scene coordinating local services and assessing damage. Mayor Mitchell Brownstein was in constant contact with staff. City Manager Nadia Di Furia and Assistant Manager Jonathan Shecter remain on scene as of this posting to coordinate with Reichson. Joining them are Urban Development Director Charles Senekal and Manager Mohammed Ali.  These two engineers know every inch of the city and are extremely helpful in this situation in organizing the response for underground services such as water supply. As work crews will begin digging up the road this evening, Senekal and Ali will work with water engineering company Sima, to minimize any disruption. While some local streets may have their water cut, PS and vCOP will begin distribution of bottled water, as per our emergency procedures.

“We have a fantastic team and I am proud to be standing here with them,” City Manager Di Furia stated.

Councillor Sidney Benizri, who lives a few houses away from the scene provided the pictures in this blog post.”It looks like tonight we need to be patient. All the teams are at work here and they’ve handled the situation very professionally,” said Benizri, who is still without power as of this posting.

Evacuated residents take shelter in Montreal Fire Department bus

Evacuated residents take shelter in Montreal Fire Department bus

Councillor Dida Berku reported that the Cavendish Mall food court was packed due to the power outage.

Many thanks to Director Reichson, Public Security agents, senior management, and all emergency personnel from Montreal, Gaz Met and Hydro Quebec for quickly bringing the situation under control and keeping our residents safe.

As Cote Saint-Lucers we are truly fortunate to have a dedicated staff and a city council so committed to our residents. Each city councillor gets involved side by side with our members of staff to ensure our residents are safe and sound. Tonight was no exception as mayor and councillors immediately began emailing, texting and calling to check on the situation and to receive frequent updates.

Gaz leak Parkhaven Kildare Photo Sidney Benizri 2016-08-30 005

 

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CSL speed trailer warns you to slow down, obey limit

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Cote Saint-Luc's speed trailer deployed on Cavendish Blvd. (July 2016. Source: CSL)

Cote Saint-Luc’s speed trailer deployed on Cavendish Blvd. (July 2016. Source: CSL)

A speed trailer (pictured above) is shared between the municipalities of Cote Saint-Luc, Hampstead and Montreal West. This summer it has been deployed in several locations in CSL, including Cavendish northbound, coming out of the underpass, and southbound at Merton. The speed limit sign at the top of the trailer is changeable according to our local streets: 30, 40 and 50 km/h.

The trailer will be situated at different locations throughout the city for a week at each time.

Local police station PDQ9 may send out an officer to issue tickets in these, or any other location, so you are advised to slow down.

CSL Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson, responsible for this valuable traffic calming device when on our territory is very responsive to complaints by residents. While speed is a police matter, our Public Safety team will be out there as additional eyes and ears and advise police of trouble spots on our territory.

Drive safely. Slow down. And watch out for pedestrians.

 

CSL, residents must work together in emergency situations: mayor

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Suburban | September 24, 2014 | Click to enlarge

Suburban | September 24, 2014 | Click to enlarge

Emergency Preparedness Plan Presented

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Cote Saint-Luc is renowned as a municipality that has been a leader for decades in Emergency Preparedness and Public Safety. Our EMS, which started in the early 1960s as a civil protection organization known as EMO is more than 50 years old.
Emergency Prep Phases
I joined EMO some 35 years ago followed by Ruth Kovac a few years later. The two of us have been partners in promoting disaster planning and safety ever since. We attended the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada in the early 1990s (along with the late Vera Danyluk, former mayor of TMR and chair of the MUC) and many disaster conferences and training sessions since.
Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

Councillors Glenn J. Nashen and Ruth Kovac enrolled at the Emergency Preparedness College of Canada 1991

I have headed up the city’s Emergency Preparedness committee for many years. Our goal is to to plan, to review, to practice and to be prepared!
But no training is as good as real live practice and we have had our fair share in Cote Saint-Luc. From floods and ice storms to dangerous heat waves we have managed local disaster to mitigate risk and inconvenience to our residents and bring situations back to normal as quickly as possible. Ruth and I have personally worked through these disasters and we’ve headed up teams of incredible volunteers and professional, skilled staff.
Our point person on this dossier is Jordy Reichson. Jordy has spent a significant part of his life honing his skills in disaster management. We have volunteered together and for many years and he has served as the city’s director of public safety, a department encompassing EMS, vCOP, Public Security, emergency communications and Emergency Preparedness as well as relations with all other emergency services.
Jordy presented an overview of our Emergency Preparedness Plan earlier this week in a public meeting, highlighting some of its changes and improvements over the years, explaining the city’s readiness to deal with disaster. The full presentation can be viewed below.
 http://youtu.be/s6W7uqsMSWs

CSL Council challenges other city councils to become Heroes in Thirty

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Councillors Ruth Kovac and Glenn J. Nashen practice CPR and revive a “victim” using an AED

A new program for teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) called the Hero in thirty Program is a simplified version of the traditional courses teaching CPR techniques that help save lives. It aims to facilitate learning and how to react quickly in an emergency situation. During the course, individuals will learn how to recognize signs of complete obstruction of the respiratory tract and cardiac arrest and prepare them to act quickly until help arrives. The Hero in thirty program represents a life-saving initiative that is accessible and affordable to all.

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Councillor Dida Berku and Mayor Anthony Housefather assist Councillor Sam Goldbloom in saving a ‘life’ with CPR and AED

Don’t forget: a cardiac arrest or a choking incident can happen at any time. You could save a loved one or a friend. Are you ready to react and become a hero for life? Regular CPR training is offered right here in Cote Saint-Luc at the Recreation department. Call 514-485-6800 or visit online.

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CSL City Council gets trained in CPR in the new Hero in Thirty program

Hero in Thirty classes, organized by Jordy Reichson, CSL Public Safety Director, will be offered in large group settings in the city. Look for the next one at a city event this summer.

 

CSL recognizes long serving veterans of EMS

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It was a great honour for me to be included among those recognized last night for their many years of service in building the Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Medical Services. CSL EMS turns 50 years old this year.  The recognition event and graduation of the current class of new medics took place amid pomp and ceremony Monday night at Cote Saint-Luc City Hall.medal-003s

The Governor General’s EMS Exemplary Service Medal was presented by Mayor Anthony Housefather, Public Safety Councillor Sam Goldbloom and Director (and long time volunteer himself) Jordy Reichson to eight veterans following more than 20 years of dedicated service.

The Exemplary Service Medal, which was established in 1994 as part of the Canadian Honours System, recognizes individuals with at least 20 years of service in Emergency Medical Services and a strong commitment to exceptional performance.

I started at what used to be called EMO (Emergency Measures Organization) immediately after high school back in 1979. These were the years prior to First Responders and a coordinated ambulance service in Montreal. Residents would telephone directly to EMO and we would respond in our small fire-rescue truck, known as RMF-11 (Rescue, Medical, Fire).

Cote Saint-Luc EMO launched my side-career as an Urgences-Santé ambulance technician in 1980

Cote Saint-Luc EMO launched my side-career as an Urgences-Santé ambulance technician in 1980

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Urgences Santé and Jeff Silver (in brown coveralls) with EMO

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Urgences Santé and Jeff Silver (in brown coveralls) with EMO

Our first responder service was launched a few years later and I spent the next 20 years in active duty as a volunteer.

Shortly after being first elected in 1990, Councillor Ruth Kovac and I set off to form the EMO Review Committee and proposed upgrading the service to a full city service with a paid director, round the clock coverage, in-house training of our volunteer medics and widespread training of our residents, staff and visitors in CPR.

My EMO involvement also led to 5 years of volunteer service on the Canadian Ski Patrol.  I rose to the level of Assistant Patrol Leader at Mont Alta in Ste-Agathe.

My EMO involvement also led to 5 years of volunteer service on the Canadian Ski Patrol. I rose to the level of Assistant Patrol Leader at Mont Alta in Ste-Agathe.

In total I have been involved in our Emergency Medical services and every aspect of Public Safety for 35 years, well over half of my life!

Receiving the Governor General's medal from Cllr. Sam Goldbloom, Mayor Anthony Housefather and Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson

Receiving the Governor General’s medal from Cllr. Sam Goldbloom, Mayor Anthony Housefather and Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson

Additionally I served 18 years as an Emergency Medical Technician with Urgences Santé, five years on the Canadian Ski Patrol, and founded and spent countless hours with the CSL volunteer Citizens on Patrol group. My involvement doesn’t stop there having overseen Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness on City Council since 1990.

I am very proud to have championed the first municipal bylaw requiring bike helmets in Canada and spending the last three decades advocating for mandatory helmet requirements for cyclists. It is with passion for caring for the injured, sick and needy that I  have promoted the legal recognition of Paramedics in pre-hospital emergency medical care in Quebec.

Proud to be among many deserving veterans of EMS including Patti-Bath Lietman, Hal Newman, Rick Liebmann

Proud to be among many deserving veterans of EMS including Patti-Bath Leitman, Hal Newman and Rick Liebmann

There are so many highlights in my years in EMS. I have performed CPR more than 125 times and successfully revived one in four patients. One of my most memorable occasions serving on Montreal ambulances was my first and only delivery of a baby boy in his mother’s house, which permitted me to proudly wear a tiny blue stork pin on my uniform.

Riding aboard Cote Saint-Luc's first Rescue Medical Fire vehicle RMF-11, 1981

Riding aboard Cote Saint-Luc’s first Rescue Medical Fire vehicle RMF-11 in 1981

I remember with pride serving CSL EMO in a historical torrential downpour in 1987 that closed our underpasses stranding thousands of residents and spending fifteen straight days overseeing emergency services and communications during the 1998 Ice Storm.

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Measures Organization, 1981

Glenn J. Nashen on duty with Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Measures Organization, 1981

Of major importance was my involvement, seven years ago, alongside Mayor Housefather, Councillor Kovac and MNA Lawrence Bergman in solidifying community support for EMS and the adoption of a special law in the National Assembly to allow our city to keep EMS as the First Responder service when the Montreal Fire Department took over this mandate everywhere else on the island.

Saving EMS at the Quebec National Assembly

Saving EMS at the Quebec National Assembly in 2007

Thank you to Mayor Housefather for his confidence in appointing me to my public safety and emergency preparedness positions for the last ten years and to Jordy Reichson for his collaboration and dedication to serving our community.

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen on duty with vCOP

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen on duty with vCOP

This has been a most rewarding, inspiring and epic journey for me, and for the thousands of volunteers who have crossed through the doors at Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Medical Services. Thank you to all those who have been involved in EMS for this great honour and immense privilege to serve.

 

Disaster planning top of mind in CSL

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This core group including Mayor Anthony Housefather, city councillors, directors and community agency reps will come together in a major disaster to manage the city's  response and recovery

This core group including Mayor Anthony Housefather, city councillors, directors and community agency reps will come together in a major disaster to manage the city’s response and recovery

Public Safety Canada, the federal agency responsible for emergency planning tells all Canadians that we should be prepared to take care of ourselves and our families for a minimum of 72 hours during a major emergency.

In the event of a major emergency, it may take emergency workers some time to get to you because they have to prioritize who needs the most help says Mayor Anthony Housefather. 

Some emergencies might require people to stay in their homes, while others emergencies might require people to leave their homes quickly. It depends on the crisis. In order to determine how best to plan and respond to such disasters the City of Cote Saint-Luc invests much time and energy to be ready for most risks however remote they may be.

Cote Saint-Luc is known throughout the region as having a culture of safety and security, of being at the ready for disaster, large and small. We are one of the few municipalities that has had an extensive emergency preparedness plan, continuously updated and tested, since at least the 1960s. In addition, we are the only ones to have an active first responder corps of more than 80 volunteers as well as a volunteer Citizens on Patrol group who’s numbers will soon exceed 90 trained members.

Emergency readiness is part of our DNA. It is incorporated in all aspects of our civil service and this positions us very well to adapt to almost any situation to best serve our residents.

 

CSL Public Security Director Jordy Reichson explains the comprehensive municipal emergency disaster plan to the city's main emergency preparedness group

CSL Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson reviews the comprehensive municipal emergency disaster plan with the city’s main preparedness group

That’s why we assembled our core group of elected officials, directors, administrators and emergency experts to launch our 2014 priority in disaster readiness, earlier this week.

I remember all too well being actively involved in the city’s emergency operations in major flooding in the 80s, apartment fires in the 80s and 90s, the ice storm in 98, heat waves, underpass blockages, house fires and power outages. I have been active in the field, in the command centre and in preparing months and years in advance. This readiness and activation mechanism is part of who I am and, with the support of our mayor, I do my part to build this into every aspect of our city services.

 

training group

A large group of leaders came together this week to discuss the city’s state of readiness for disaster and plans to focus attention on testing our plans this year

 

Having worked on many versions of the Côte Saint-Luc Emergency Preparedness Plan since the early 80s it is critical that we always think about our roles and responsibilities in dealing with various types of emergencies, including man-made incidents and natural disasters. It provides the specific procedures to follow in emergency and includes city staff, volunteers, partner services and the public.

As the council member responsible for emergency preparedness I am focused on practicing and refining our skills so that we can be more prepared when a disaster does strike. Our Emergency Preparedness Committee, made up of city council, staff and subject matter experts, meets on a regular basis to review our plan, organize training scenarios and help ensure that we are always ready to intervene at a moment’s notice.

Our director responsible for this plan is Jordy Reichson, a long-time member of the administration and volunteer in the city’s EMS first responder services. Jordy ensures that a management structure is put into place, which will deals with everything from sheltering evacuees, clearing roads, keeping records, screening volunteers and communicating with the public through various means including social media and our new mass communication system (to be launched soon).

Emergency Prep Phases 

Thank you to our staff and volunteers for their constant attention in support of our emergency readiness. Under the professional leadership of Reichson is his new trusty manager, Philip Chateauvert along with our corps of EMS and vCOP volunteers and public security agents. City Manager Tanya Abramovitch and our department directors all get involved in this important issue. We partner with the CLSC for health issues, local police Commander Marc Cournoyer, CP Rail Police and Federation CJA’s community security chief. Leadership, collaboration and preparedness are key to the long term safety of our community and our residents.

Beat the heat in CSL

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The high heat and humidity warnings across the Montreal region this week has triggered measures to keep Cote Saint-Lucers cool and safe. Today, the municipal pool will be open all day and evening to the public, at no charge, and for extended hours.

Other options to stay cool include visiting the CSL Public Library at City Hall, or the Library Express in the Aquatic and Community Centre (ACC) on Parkhaven.

If you have elderly parents, friends or neighbours, check in on them to ensure they are keeping cool and well hydrated.

Never, ever leave a baby, toddler or a pet unattended in a hot vehicle, even with the windows slightly opened.  As we have seen too often, even a slight delay in such circumstances can be a fatal mistake.

Do not hesitate to call 911 if there is any doubt about an emergency situation.

Thankfully, in Cote Saint-Luc our comprehensive Emergency Preparedness planning includes CSL Public Security, EMS, vCOP and emergency communications in addition to the Montreal Police and Fire Departments.

CSL Emergency Preparedness is led by Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson and  I am chairman of the EP committee.

 

CSL to meet with CP over railyards

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CSL to meet with CP over railyards

Joel Goldenberg, The Suburban

July 10, 2013

Côte St. Luc asked for, and will be getting, a “frank and open” meeting with CP Rail regarding safety and security issues relating to the St. Luc yards, which neighbours that city, in light of the railway disaster in Lac Mégantic involving a Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway train, Councillor Dida Berku told The Suburban Monday.

Railyards surround Côte St. Luc.

Councillor Dida Berku spoke to Breanne Feigel, director of public affairs for CP, on Monday.

“I told her we want more accountability and assurance of security for the residents, because we live next to the largest railyard in Quebec,” Berku told The Suburban Monday. “I want details of the transport of dangerous goods and oil, and other hazardous materials.

“That’s a major issue with the railways — they don’t want to reveal what cargo they’re carrying. They don’t want to tell us how many tankers of oil, or chlorine, they carry. They say it’s for security reasons, it could be for that or for commercial reasons. They don’t give away that information.

“But, on the other hand, our residents want to know, and there’s more and more oil tankers going through railyards. We also want to know what security measures are being taken to prevent major accidents. We want more cooperation and information.”

Berku said that at St. Luc, cargo trains share tracks with AMT commuter trains, which travel in the area of Baily Road during the day while freight and cargo travels at night.

The councillor added that some issues have to be addressed with the federal government.

“One of them is how do municipalities get access to information, if not totally public, at least for emergency preparedness. We have an emergency preparedness plan, and in order to properly prepare, we need to know what kind of materials are being transported.”

Another issue is the security of the tracks. Berku said those commenting have said that the Lac Mégantic disaster would not have happened in Europe, as there are more safety measures on the tracks.

“The problem in Canada is the tracks are privately managed, so the government doesn’t really have that much control over the safety of the tracks. That has to be addressed at the federal level.”

Breanne Feigel of CP told The Suburban the rail company will not be offering any comments “out of respect to the residents of the Quebec community at the centre of this tragic incident, and the investigations now taking place.”

•••

Jordy Reichson, head of public safety in Côte St. Luc, said the possibility of train derailment, the response to it and possible consequences, are covered in the city’s emergency preparedness plan.

“We hope that nothing like what happened in Lac Mégantic happens anywhere, but if it was to happen, because of the unique nature of the railways and the fact they’re governed by federal legislation, there’s coordination between the city’s emergency plans and the railyards. What works to our direct advantage, as far as Côte St. Luc is concerned, is that the CP police office is just at the end of Westminster, and we have good relations with them in terms of coordinating and communicating the on scene resources to make sure they do what they need to do [in case of disaster], such as stopping other rail traffic and evacuating cars.”

On EP week, thank an emergency responder

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Cote Saint-Luc’s finest in orange: volunteer Citizens on Patrol

As Emergency Preparedness Week winds down across Canada I believe it’s important for everyone to take a moment to thank someone involved in emergency services and emergency preparedness, especially those who volunteer their time.  It is because of these fine individuals and their sense of dedication that all of us are safer where we live, play and work each day.

Kudos to Cote Saint-Luc's long-serving medics

Cote Saint-Luc’s long-serving EMS volunteers being congratulated by City Council

I salute everyone involved in Cote Saint-Luc’s Public Safety Department starting with our volunteers.  These folks who give so much of themselves within EMS and vCOP are terrific in so many ways.  Without salary, they show up for their shifts, rain or shine, heat wave or deep freeze.  They do continuous training and provide extra coverage at special events, all to ensure our safety.  They respond when called upon and are always at the ready.  Thanks so much to all of you.

CSL launches eco-friendly COP Scooter Patrol

CSL launches eco-friendly COP Scooter Patrol

Our CSL Public Security agents patrol our streets 24/7.  They are friendly and helpful professionals here to maintain order within our city, to educate our residents and visitors and to help when help is needed. They enforce our bylaws to ensure our neighbourhoods are clean and orderly.  Merci a tous l’équipe pour vos efforts remarcable.

Cote Saint-Luc volunteer Emergency Medical Services honour guard

Cote Saint-Luc volunteer Emergency Medical Services honour guard

Our emergency communications staff, also known as dispatchers, must answer all the phone calls and send the right resources, quickly and professionally.  They juggle phones, Urgences Santé and EMS radio systems, computer-aided dispatch screens and more. Thanks to them for keeping calm under pressure and for their polite and helpful interactions with residents.

Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson

Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson

Public Safety Chief Jerome Pontbriand

Public Safety Chief Jerome Pontbriand

 

Our team is headed by Director Jordy Reichson and Chief Jerome Pontbriand.  Jordy oversees the entire operation of 150 volunteers and some 20 staff members.  He also plans for wide scale emergencies. Jordy deals with residents and partner agencies and plans strategically to keep our city safe.

Jerome works directly with our volunteers in vCOP and EMS.  He helps to bring them ongoing training and improvement to help them meet the challenges of servicing our city. Jerome is a seasoned paramedic who makes sure you get a first responder fast when you need one.

Both Jordy and Jerome are committed emergency professionals, dedicated to the safety and security of all Cote Saint-Lucers as well as those working and visiting here. YOu may even bump into one of them on a 911 call.

EMS Chief Sheldon "Shloime" Goldberg and his team of skilled and dedicated medics are always close at hand, ready to spring into action

EMS Chief Sheldon “Shloime” Goldberg and his team of skilled and dedicated medics are always close at hand, ready to spring into action

So please be sure to salute our emergency responders that are in and around Cote Saint-Luc (and all across our country). In addition to those solely in our city I mentioned above, there are also Montreal police officers and firefighters and CP Rail police.  You’ll occasionally see the RCMP here as well.  And of course there are the paramedics of Urgences Santé, responding to all of our medical 911 calls.  Please thanks them for all they do to keep us safe and secure, for answering our calls, for being ready when we need them most.

Cote Saint-Luc Public Security officer Jean-Noel Champagne

Cote Saint-Luc Public Security officer Jean-Noel Champagne

 

CSL crews save lives

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Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Medical Services volunteers have had more excitement over the last few days than any volunteer could expect.  While on some shifts our volunteers watch the clock tick by, others keep them hopping, sometimes involving simultaneous emergency medical calls in different corners of our city.  In the past few days our volunteer First Responders successfully resuscitated two patients.

A few days ago the EMS overnight crew responded to a 911 call for a patient in convulsions and surprisingly found a 37 year old female in cardiac arrest. Out came the defibrillator and the EMS crew of Anthony and Robert delivered one shock and began CPR maneuvers before Urgences-santé ambulance technicians arrived on scene.

The ambulance crew delivered several more shocks while en route to the hospital. The patient regained consciousness in hospital and we learned that the patient will suffer no long term effects from the incident.

Earlier this week a man in his 70s collapsed outside of Qualitifruits on Westminster Avenue. The EMS crew was already at an emergency pediatric trauma call, so Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson responded, lights flashing and siren wailing. When he arrived, the patient had no pulse.  Notwithstanding frigid outside temperatures below -20C, Reichson hooked the man up to the defibrillator and delivered one shock.  Urgences-santé ambulance techs arrived shortly thereafter and felt a spontaneous pulse.  The collapsed man began breathing on his own and was rushed to hospital.

These very real examples show just how invaluable our EMS is to our city and our residents.  Thanks to Cote Saint-Luc EMS crews for saving two lives in the last week and for countless other amazing interventions to assist our residents and visitors every day.

 

CSL EMS volunteers come from CSL too

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Free Press, December 19, 2012

2012-12-19 EMS 25yrs Goldberg2

Free Press, December 19, 2012

Happy Holidays to CSL Citizens on Patrol

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Happy patrollers:  (L-R) Harvey and Susie Schwartz, Mitchell Herf, Lewis Cohen, Glenn J. Nashen, Ruth Kovac, Dr. Gerry Trager, Peter Kovac

Happy patrollers: (L-R) Harvey and Susie Schwartz, Mitchell Herf, Lewis Cohen, Glenn J. Nashen, Ruth Kovac, Dr. Gerry Trager, Peter Kovac

On Tuesday night the Cote Saint-Luc volunteer Citizens on Patrol turned out in large numbers to City Hall.  This was not an emergency civil preparedness drill.  To the contrary, this was a festive gathering to thank our dedicated volunteers for their deep commitment in helping to keep our city safe.

Volunteer supervisor Susie Schwartz organized a lovely buffet dinner for the 80 vCOP members who patrol Cote Saint-Luc streets, parks and facilities at all hours of day and night.

Several members were recognized for going above and beyond the call of duty in terms of hundreds of hours of service during the year as well as for giving extra time to serve as team leaders and supervisors, handling administrative tasks, training of new members, continuing education of existing members, scheduling, vehicle maintenance and much more.

Also in attendance were CSL Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson and Manager Jerome Pontbriand along with Police Commander Sylvain Bissonnette and his right hand man Lt. J.P. Theoret.

Bissonnette and Theoret have been staunch supporters of the vCOP program and through close collaboration between vCOP, police and CSL Public Security, Bissonnette reaffirmed that Cote Saint-Luc continues to be the safest community on the Island of Montreal.

Mayor Anthony Housefather was on hand to personally thank each vCOP on behalf of Cote Saint-Luc residents.  The mayor has shown continuous support and much enthusiasm for the vCOP program since its inception six-and-a-half years ago.

I saluted the time, effort and passion that our vCOP members contribute to the community.  Our volunteers are unlike any group in Quebec.

Similarly, I had the pleasure of thanking our EMS volunteers at their holiday dinner just a few nights earlier.  EMS troops dedicate hundreds of hours, 24/7, responding to some 3000 emergency medical calls each year.  With enough volunteers at the ready, EMS has even responded to four simultaneous emergencies on several occasions this year.

At the vCOP celebration I also introduced Councillor Ruth Kovac as my partner in crime prevention.  Ruth and I have been actively involved in emergency preparedness for over 30 years.  Her husband, Peter, joined vCOP last year.  Ruth prepared a poetic tribute to the vCOP members as well as to their spouses who give them the time to serve their city.

ODE TO A VCOP (by Ruth Kovac)

Twenty four hours in every day

Where do you go to give some away?

Time is such a precious gift

And yet you come here and do a shift!

Whether it’s Allan, Gerry, Peter or Paul

It’s a rewarding experience for one and for all

Driving a scooter, a van or a bike

It’s your eyes and ears

And your voice

Over the mike

From dispatch you might hear

“A child is lost”

So you summon all the troops

And all this at no extra cost

At Special events your presence

Is so needed

So once again

The request has been heeded

You don your gear

So proud in orange and black

Your heads are held high

There is no turning a back.

You might stand for hours

Watching over the crowd

Our Cote Saint Luc Residents

Can surely feel proud.

It might be boring

Bur never a complaining word

Just “doing the job”

For our wonderful suburb

Friendships have been strengthened while

Being on shift

You have also learned CPR

And radio protocols, all a personal development lift.

You often take photos

Of things that you see

And send them to Glenn…….

And then he sends them on to me

We talk about the those questions

And discuss at great length

How you all make Cote Saint Luc better

As we go from strength to strength

Perhaps you have seen

An opened garage door

Come upon a car accident

Or seen water gushing into a ground floor

The shifts might be many

Or perhaps just a few

But each one is precious

A donated gift from you

And no matter how your time is spent

Cote Saint Luc knows each of you is heaven sent!

So from Glenn and myself

And Council too

Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah

Volunteers…THANK YOU!!!

Sad farewell to a fallen firefighter

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Montreal firefighter Thierry Godfrind who fell in the line of duty last Friday

A civic funeral will be held today at the Notre-Dame Basilica for a Montreal firefigher who died last week after he was struck by a fire truck.  Thierry Godfrind, 39, died Friday while responding to a call in the St-Laurent borough.  At the time, firefighters were responding to a call at a residential building.

Condolences may be sent via email to sim@ville.montreal.qc.ca.

Godfrind is the first firefighter to die on the job in Montreal since 2006.

Being a firefighter is far from an easy job.  The training in arduous and the risks are great.  Each call brings a new challenge, a new risk.  Montreal firefighters are at the service of all residents of the City of Montreal and the suburban municipalities, such as Cote Saint-Luc as well as all who work and visit the Montreal Agglomeration. Each of them serves with compassion and devotion and for that they have my appreciation and respect.

I wish to publicly express my sincere condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Thierry Godfrind.  A loss like this affects our community and my constituents share in the grief and sadness.

Our own local emergency responders including our Emergency Medical Services volunteers, volunteer Citizens on Patrol and Public Security agents work side by side with the Montreal firefighters from Station 78 on Cote Saint-Luc Road and other stations.  As such they too share in the pain at the loss of a fellow emergency responder. I am proud that these local volunteers and professionals will attend the civic funeral today under the leadership of Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson and Chief Jerome Pontbriand representing the City of Cote Saint-Luc.

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