Watch and share: Nashen plans for Traffic calming in Cote Saint-Luc

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You’ve told me that you’re concerned about slowing down traffic on our streets. I work with our experts to find the right traffic calming measures: I got the ball rolling with painted lines to visually narrow the roadway as well as bollards to slow down cars, and bumped out sidewalks to make our streets safer to cross and for children at play. Humps are sometimes necessary too – especially on long residential stretches. I brought the idea of those middle-of-the-road crosswalk and “Stop for Pedestrians in Crosswalk” signs to CSL – I plan to further expand these initiatives.

La question de la circulation est devenue primordiale et à cet effet, j’ai initié plusieurs mesures afin de rendre nos rues plus sécuritaires pour les piétons, les enfants et les conducteurs. J’ai joué un rôle prédominant en lançant des panneaux de signalisation pour avertir les automobilistes que des piétons traversent la rue.

UPDATED: Safer Cavendish – Kildare intersection

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Cavendish Kildare intersection getting safer with adjustment to traffic light sequence

Cavendish Kildare intersection getting safer with adjustment to traffic light sequence. Crossing guard Norman Klein assists pedestrians in this photo, courtesy of Mike Cohen.

 

UPDATED Nov. 18, 2016 6:30PM: Electrical problems solved and all functioning as planned.

Motorists using the Cavendish/Kildare intersection will find it easier to get through the intersection starting November 15, thanks to a new split phase configuration.

In my short stint as mayor late last year I struck a task force to study the traffic light sequencing in order to improve pedestrian safety without impeding traffic flow. Consultants returned with proposed modifications so that motorists travelling westbound on Kildare will be able to drive through the intersection at Cavendish while traffic in the opposing direction waits. This allows drivers to turn left (or turn right, or go straight) without opposing traffic.

To help visualize the change, imagine you are a driver who left the JPPS/Bialik campus and is heading west along Kildare towards the police station. When you approach the traffic light at Cavendish Blvd., you can use the left or middle lane to turn left or the middle lane to go straight. Motorists coming from the opposite direction will have a red right, which will allow you to turn left (or to go straight) without having to worry about oncoming traffic.

cavendish_sign_CSL

 

Likewise, motorists coming from the opposite side will have their chance to move through the intersection without interference.

Just as many vehicles as before will be able to pass through the intersection. However, the process will be less stressful and far safer.

Motorists and pedestrians alike will benefit as less distraction and confusion means more attention paid to the pedestrian.  Pedestrians will only have to look out for vehicles in one direction, and motorists will be able to look out for pedestrians, not oncoming cars.

Of course, pedestrians should always use the crosswalk signal and when available walk with the crossing guard.

Once the change it made, please let city engineers know what you think about it and if it has helped your driving experience. Email engineering@cotesaintluc.org.

Cavendish - Kildare Intersection

Cavendish – Kildare Intersection

I continue to head up the task force on traffic priorities that meets several times each year to review local policies and the Quebec Highway Act in order to make our roads, intersections and crosswalks safer. A major example of our work was the speed limit reduction along Fleet Road in conjunction with the Town of Hampstead. Pedestrian safety is at the top of our list as we continue to study ways to modernize and improve our 147 roads in Cote Saint-Luc. What ideas would you like to share?

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs, among the first in Quebec.

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs, among the first in Quebec.

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL - J'ai amené l'idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL – J’ai amené l’idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

 

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen launched these new pedestrian safety signs which he "imported" from Florida

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen launched these new pedestrian safety signs which he “imported” from Florida

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Taking it slow in District 6

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Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs

I’ve been very active with Chief Engineer Charles Senekal and his staff at analyzing the traffic patterns across the city as chair of the Transportation Committee.

In District 6 and across our city I was chiefly responsible in conceiving of traffic calming measures to slow traffic and improve pedestrian safety.

New lane narrowing lines have been painted on Melling, Shalom, Einstein and elsewhere. We’ve lowered the speed limit on Shalom Ave. and ensured hedges are trimmed at corners to improve visibility. We have installed speed cushions, centre-of-the-road crosswalk signs and bollards on Mackle Rd. and on Einstein Ave. Parkhaven Ave. is much safer now in front of the ACC and École Maimonides with better crosswalk markings and signs. The city has smoothed out the raised crosswalks to keep them safe for the students and more comfortable for motorists.

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen launched these new pedestrian safety signs which he "imported" from Florida

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen launched these new pedestrian safety signs which he “imported” from Florida

New speed limit signs and lane choking was installed on Wavell Rd. near Melling Ave. A major speed limit adjustment was made on Mackle Road on its entire length. These measures are having a positive impact across District 6 and throughout our city making our streets safer for all.

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL - J'ai amené l'idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL – J’ai amené l’idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

 

Dans le district 6, on prend son temps

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I proposed median crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL - J'ai amené l'idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

I proposed middle-of-the-road crosswalk signs that have made crossing the road safer in CSL – J’ai amené l’idée de ces nouveaux panneaux de signalisation pour piétons qui ont fait traverser la route plus sûre en CSL

En tant que président du Comité de circulation, j’ai participé activement à l’étude des mouvements de circulation dans la ville avec l’ingénieur en chef Charles Senekal et son personnel.

Pour le district 6 et l’ensemble de la ville, je me suis occupé surtout de concevoir des mesures d’apaisement visant à ralentir la circulation et à renforcer la sécurité des piétons. Des lignes ont été peintes sur la chaussée pour rétrécir les voies, entre autres sur Melling, Shalom et Einstein. Nous avons abaissé la limite de vitesse sur l’avenue Shalom et nous nous sommes assurés de faire tailler les haies aux intersections pour améliorer la visibilité.

Sur le chemin Mackle et l’avenue Einstein, nous avons installé des coussins surélevés, des panneaux indicateurs au milieu de la chaussée et des bollards aux passages pour piétons.

L’avenue Parkhaven est maintenant plus sécuritaire devant le CCA et l’École Maimonides grâce à l’amélioration du marquage et de la signalisation des passages pour piétons.

Le conseiller Glenn J. Nashen a lancé ces panneaux de sécurité

Le conseiller Glenn J. Nashen a lancé ces panneaux de sécurité

La ville adoucira les passages surélevés pour les rendre plus sécuritaires pour les élèves et plus confortables pour les automobilistes.

Une nouvelle signalisation a été installée pour les limites de vitesse, et les voies ont été rétrécies sur le chemin Wavell près de Melling.

Un ajustement majeur de la limite de vitesse a été instauré sur toute la longueur du chemin Mackle. Ces mesures ont un effet positif dans le district 6 et sur toute la ville, en rendant le réseau routier plus sécuritaire pour tous.

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs

Councillor Glenn J. Nashen initiated new high visibility crosswalk signage in Cote Saint-Luc such as the one pictured above as well as the middle-of-the-road flexi signs

CSL mayor favours right on red

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By Joel Goldenberg, The Suburban

June 6, 2012

Côte Saint-Luc mayor Anthony Housefather, speaking for himself and not his council as a whole, supports allowing right turns on red lights on the island of Montreal. “I favour it because it is simply logical,” Housefather says. “There is no reason the island of Montreal should be different than everywhere else in North America. If there are downtown arteries where right on red should not exist or other arteries where it should not be allowed because of danger — perhaps Kildare/Cavendish for us — each city should just put up a sign saying no right on red at that intersection. If it ever came up for a vote at the agglomeration council I would certainly vote in favour of allowing right on red.”

But Montreal West mayor Beny Masella does not believe Montrealers are ready for right turns on red. His town, with perhaps one exception at the border with Côte St. Luc, does not even have a traffic light — not even the busy part of the commercial district of Westminster near the rail crossing.

But in terms of right on red in general for the island, “not yet. I don’t think we’re at the point where we can deal with it properly. “We’re not even stopping at pedestrian crosswalks yet, so if we think we can go when we have pedestrians crossing, that makes me a little nervous. I’d like to see us a bit more conscientious about stopping at the crosswalks when there’s a pedestrian there, and then we’ll go to the next step. Off the island might be a different story — there’s a lot less crosswalks. I’m not there yet to say I support right on red.”

In terms of other big cities, Masella said he was recently in the U.S. and saw how a car automatically stopped when a pedestrian was crossing a crosswalk. “I’d love to see us enforcing the rule about stopping for pedestrians on crosswalks, and then we could take the next step.”

In my opinion:  Mayor Housefather certainly speaks for me too.  It is ridiculous that a motorist may turn right on red in Laval, Quebec City or for that matter St. Sauveur, but cannot in Cote Saint-Luc, Hampstead or Pointe Claire.  Put up a “No turn on red” wherever city’s determine those intersections are too congested and leave the other 99% to flow freely.

As for Mayor Masella’s point about not stopping for pedestrians in crosswalk, police should start ticketing. Our lax enforcement on pedestrian safety in Quebec is nothing short of shameful.

What do you think?  Click on LEAVE A COMMENT.

Look out for new pedestrian crosswalk on Fleet, Hamsptead

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Free Press, May 23. 2012, Click to enlarge

If you haven’t noticed the blinking LED-lit crosswalk sign on Fleet Road in Hampstead you better take note.  Hampstead has added this signage with corresponding fines of $154 for an infraction to its collection of confusing traffic signs designed to keep through traffic off its side streets.

Their Councillor responsible for traffic safety, Harvey Shaffer, has also indicated that they’ve asked Police Station 9 commander Sylvain Bissonnette to step up patrols on their territory.

I’ve been a critic of Hampstead’s bizarre and difficult to understand no left turn signs along Fleet (search “Fleet” or “Hampstead” on this blog), and while I strongly support pedestrian crosswalk safety this is going to be a very difficult one to abide by and to enforce.

Traffic along this main artery is steady and travels at 50 km/h, plus or minus about 10 km/h I’d guesstimate.  Pedestrians would be safer to wait for a break in the clusters of traffic rather than to negotiate their way across while one lane may come to a halt but not the others.

Hampstead would be well advised to install a pedestrian call button that would allow a person to activate yellow flashing lights overhead to signal a pedestrian is present.  This would enhance the safety significantly on this thoroughfare.

In any case, have a look how many pedestrians are trying to cross in the next week or two.  I’ve checked every time I passed over the last several weeks  and have yet to spot a single pedestrian.

Letters: In defence of Nashen

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2011-08-17 In defence of Nashen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CSL’s Cavendish-Kildare dangerous to cross: resident

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CSL’s Cavendish-Kildare dangerous to cross: resident

By Joel Goldenberg

The Suburban, June 15, 2011

Côte St. Luc resident Shirley Rosen and others expressed worry last week about the busy intersection of Cavendish Blvd. and Kildare Road.

That intersection has been a concern for many years.

Rosen told councillor Mike Cohen’s recent district council meeting that she has sent e-mails to the city regarding the traffic light and the issue of crossing Kildare on the south side of Cavendish. “You cannot get across the street in the length of time they give you because the cars are turning from every which side, and I’m fast,” she said. “The reply was that they’ll look into it, and it could take up to three years and, in the meantime, cross on the north side of Cavendish. This should be corrected now.

“What is going to be done, and how soon? Because something is going to happen.”

Cohen said he discussed ideas with Senekal and engineering division project manager Mohammed Ali. The councillor emphasized that none of the ideas have been discussed at the council level.

“The one issue I’ve heard more than anything else from constituents in the last five years is Kildare and Cavendish,” Cohen added. “Sometimes we please the pedestrian and they have a little more time [to cross], and the motorist is upset. Sometimes the motorist is pleased, and the pedestrians say it takes too long [to cross]. We all know the rush hours are no picnic.

“It’s a very difficult corner.”

Senekal says plans — just being discussed at the moment — call for a two-phase reconfiguration, first involving — this year — Cavendish and what will be called The Avenue, the street that will run east-west between Kildare and Mackle into the planned Cavendish Mall development.

“Due to the development, we’ll have a potential increase in traffic out of that exit, even though they’ll have a choice of three entry and exit points,” Senekal explained. “We’re trying to make it safer for the pedestrians to cross, and easier for people to get in and out of the development without waiting too long at the traffic light.”

Senekal said the second phase would involve Cavendish and Kildare.

“I’m well aware of the issues on the south side [of Cavendish], especially crossing Kildare east to west,” he acknowledged. “We have a concept in mind in which we’ll try our best to eradicate all these conflict points.

“We’re looking at unrestricted left and right turns — no traffic lights, for example, for that traffic — and at the same time, creating many little islands where pedestrians only have to cross one instead of two to three lanes of traffic. Where possible, we’re shortening the walking distances.

We want to create pedestrian refuges in the middle so if you can’t make it, you have a safe place to wait. “By adjusting a lot of these different lanes, we have a little bit more freedom to actually program the [traffic light] controllers so that we could give you more time. Right now, we’re at our maximum, we cannot change anything more [in the time given to cross Cavendish].”

Senekal said he hopes, by this time next year, there will be “something on paper to be presented to council.” This prompted a negative reaction from the audience, in terms of the time it would take to make actual changes.

“You have to understand that these things aren’t done overnight,” Cohen said. The councillor added that he and Senekal discussed an “extraordinary plan,” of which he could not share the details.

“It’s an idea that will be brought to council, and if council buys into it, any type of fix that we come up at Cavendish and Kildare is not going to be cheap,” Cohen warned. “But we realize that it is vitally important we come up with something. I wish there was a quick fix.”

Councillor Steven Erdelyi said the problems stem from most of the cars at Kildare and Cavendish turning left or right, as opposed to going straight.

***

In my opinion: The traffic lights and pedestrian crossing signals at this intersection have been tweaked as much as possible as Councillor Cohen mentioned.  Any adjustment to one has a negative impact upon the other. 

I have advocated for pedestrian refuges (simply put, a place to stand in the middle of the street when you cannot cross on a single light) for many years.  As chairman of the City’s Public Safety and Transportation committees I have studied this intersection repeatedly with our experts and am convinced that a complete reconfiguration with islands to allow for pedestrians to cross one lane, or two lanes maximum, is the safest way to go. 

This project will cost quite a bit (I’m guessing over one million dollars) and will only be completed either in conjunction with the redevelopment of the Cavendish Mall in another year or two or with the Cavendish Extension in another six or seven years (fingers crossed!).

Autumn message to my constituents in District 6

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"Traffic-calmed neighbourhood" sign ...

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I have reported that the vision of the City’s Public Safety and Traffic Committee, which I lead, is to create a traffic-calmed and pedestrian-friendly community. We are achieving this objective as we have initiated more traffic-calming measures on the most problematic blocks. In the last few months we have installed bollards, flower planters, speed humps, middle-of-the-road pedestrian signs, raised crosswalks and cement crosswalks. As well, we have doubled the width of painted lines of crosswalks making them far more visible. We have also painted lines to “visually narrow” sections of Einstein and David Lewis, effectively slowing down traffic. Finally, speed on all side streets has been reduced from 50 km/h to 40 km/h.

I have worked closely with Charles Senekal, Manager of Urban Planning and Traffic Engineer, Jordy Reichson, Director of Public Safety, and our valued committee members to develop effective, pleasing solutions. I always search out new ideas in my travels and online. Safer cycling and a shuttle bus services are two priorities still in the works. All of these measures are creating a safer environment for pedestrians and motorists of all ages.

Planning of the new intergenerational centre and indoor pool is well underway and construction is just beginning. I want to reassure nearby residents that I have spoken out to ensure minimum impact in terms of parking, noise and lighting issues, and relocation and enhancement of the playground. Your concerns are my concerns. When all is done we will have an amazing centre just a short walk from your home.

Our volunteer Emergency Medical Services and Citizens on Patrol teams are always looking for new recruits. We provide training, valuable skills, camaraderie and a rewarding experience. Call City Hall for details or visit CoteSaintLuc.org.

I invite you to subscribe to local updates at www.GlennJ.Nashen.com.

To contact me, call 514-485-6945 or send an e-mail message to GJNashen@CoteSaintLuc.org or subscribe to updates at www.GlennJ.Nashen.com.

Crosswalk safety – A top priority in Cote Saint-Luc

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Look for these new signs in Cote Saint-Luc.  They are your reminder to always stop for pedestrians at crosswalks as required by the Quebec Highway Safety Code.

I spotted similar signs earlier this year in Parkland, Florida, which I photographed and recommended to the Public Safety and Traffic Committee.  Traffic Engineer Charles Senekal adapted the sign for use in Cote Saint-Luc and they are now prominently displayed in six locations.  They will be moved next year to different locations to serve as a prominent reminder that pedestrians have the right of way.

Quebecers may not be famous for respecting those crossing the street but we are changing driving habits in Cote Saint-Luc one step as a time through awareness, education and enforcement. 

So next time you see someone stepping into the crosswalk be sure to come to a full stop until they cross the street.  Otherwise, it could cost you $100-$200 fine plus court costs and three demerit points.

Pedestrians and Drivers: Care and Vigilance Save Lives