What are the essential steps in preconception planning?

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The decision to have a baby is certainly an important one. But even before conceiving a child, there are things to do and others to avoid for an easy pregnancy.

To learn more about what is known as preconception planning, Barry Morgan welcomed Dr. Judy Hagshi, a family doctor specializing in low-risks obstetrics at the Jewish General Hospital.

Most of my readers will know that Dr. Judy Hagshi is my wonderful wife so I am particularly proud to share this episode of the YOUR HEALTH podcast on my blog. Please share it with whomever can benefit from this vital information.

And if this topic doesn’t meet your own needs why not tune in to any of the other subjects, expertly hosted by the talented media specialists, Carl Theriault and Barry Morgan?

YOUR HEALTH is produced by my superb team in Communications and Media Relations at the CIUSSS West-Central Montreal and can be found on Google Play or Apple Podcasts as well as on Soundcloud and also on this page in English and this one for French episodes.

Carbon monoxide from car in garage killed Côte-St-Luc couple: coroner

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This is a heartbreaking, tragic reminder to be vigilant and prudent when parking your car in the garage and of the critical need to have CO detectors in your home.

GJN
House where couple was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 in Côte-St-Luc. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

Woman probably forgot to turn her car’s ignition off after parking it in the garage

FRÉDÉRIC TOMESCO  Montreal Gazette: December 9, 2019

A Côte-St-Luc couple died of carbon monoxide poisoning last winter when the wife probably forgot to turn her car’s ignition off after parking it in the garage, a coroner has concluded.

Roger Banon and Simone Elkeslassy were found dead by one of their sons Feb. 6 after uncharacteristically failing to answer phone calls during the day. Firefighters called to the scene noted the presence of carbon monoxide inside the garage and the house.

The couple lived in a single-family residence, with their bedroom located directly above the garage. A carbon monoxide detector was installed in the basement and was in service, the report said.

Banon, 88, had Parkinson’s disease. He had the constant help and support of his 84-year-old wife and other family members, according to the coroner’s report, which was released Monday. Husband and wife — both wearing pyjamas — were found lying on the floor of the guest room.

“It appears that Mr. Banon’s spouse probably had a moment of distraction when returning from the grocery store on Feb. 5 and forgot to shut down the engine of her car,” coroner Julie-Kim Godin concluded in her report dated Sept. 25, ruling out suicide.

Having just returned from a trip, Elkeslassy “had to resume her activities and her routine,” Godin wrote. “She had several tasks to perform and needed to take care of her partner. She probably had a lot of concerns on her mind, which contributed to this moment of distraction.”

Montreal police investigators found Elkeslassy’s car parked in the garage. While the garage door leading onto the driveway was closed, investigators were unable to establish whether the inside door leading to the house was open or closed.

The car key was in the ignition and it was switched on, the coroner’s report said. The fuel gauge indicated that the tank was empty and the hood was lukewarm.

“This allows us to conclude that the engine continued to run, probably for several hours, producing significant carbon monoxide emissions in the house,” Godin wrote.

Elkeslassy was an “active, autonomous woman who was very involved in the community,” Godin also wrote. She was seeing a doctor regularly, and a recent appointment had not resulted in any problems being identified. Elkeslassy “loved life and was very resilient,” the report cited her doctor as saying. She had never expressed suicidal ideas, the report said.

Carbon monoxide poisoning is a recurring problem in Quebec.

On Friday, a Laval woman was found dead in a house after being poisoned by the toxic gas, police said. Two other people were taken to a hospital for the same reason. Results of the investigation may be announced Tuesday, a Laval police spokesperson said Monday.

Carbon monoxide is a clear, odourless and tasteless gas that can make humans sick and can lead to death. The gas is created when fuels such as oil, coal, wood, gasoline, propane and natural gas are burned.

Carbon monoxide doesn’t irritate the eyes or respiratory tract. But when a person inhales it, the gas enters their blood and interferes with oxygen intake, damaging tissue, according to Quebec’s health department. The effects can vary depending on the quantity of the gas in the air and the length of exposure. Severe carbon monoxide poisoning can lead to a coma and death within minutes.

ftomesco@postmedia.com

Meadowbrook developer loses appeal of lawsuit against Montreal | Montreal Gazette

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via Meadowbrook developer loses appeal of lawsuit against Montreal | Montreal Gazette

This is indeed good news in this decades long matter. The courts have recognized the actions of the City of Montreal in not allowing construction on the Lachine side to be reasonable and justifiable.

How much longer until we see Meadowbrook as a regional public park for all to enjoy?

MUHC doctors call for Quebec helmet law

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Quebec is way behind in not requiring bike helmets. Studies have proven the benefits in reducing risk of traumatic brain injury for decades. In fact, helmets can reduce TBI by as much as 85%. So why has Quebec lagged behind the rest of Canada? And why is Quebec’s largest bike lobby against such a move?

Cote Saint-Luc was the first city in Canada to bring in a bylaw nearly 30 years ago! Indeed, this was one of my major planks when I first ran for council and I take immense pride in this bylaw, adopted in 1992.

You can read all about the background on bike laws in Canada and the Cote Saint-Luc initiative by searching in this blog.

Do you wear a bike helmet?

Here’s the MUHC press release:

“All cyclists, regardless of their age, face the risk of head injury, traumatic brain injury or concussion. Wearing a helmet reduces the risk of head injuries by up to 85 percent, and the risk of fatality by up to 44 percent” 
Michel Abouassaly, MUHC Coordinator of the Department of Adult Neurotraumatology.

Mandatory helmets for cyclists must apply to children and adults

MONTREAL, September 19, 2019 – The team of the Department of Adult Neurotraumatology at the McGill University Health Center (MUHC) supports their colleague at the Montreal Children’s Hospital, Dr. Hussein Wissanji, who in an open letter, demanded, among other things, that helmets be worn for cyclists aged 18 years and under to reduce deaths and health complications associated with traumatic brain injury.  He also called for the need to promote safe riding habits and road developments that are adapted for cyclists.

Furthermore, the Adult Neurotraumatology team strongly recommends that helmet protection apply to cyclists of all ages.

Given the current proliferation of alternative modes of transport these days (bike-sharing, scooters, electric bicycles), the wearing of bicycle helmets for all is necessary in order to ensure the health and the safety of users.

“All cyclists, regardless of their age, face the risk of head injury, traumatic brain injury or concussion. Wearing a helmet reduces the risk of head injuries by up to 85 percent, and the risk of fatality by up to 44 percent,” says Michel Abouassaly, MUHC Coordinator of the Department of Adult Neurotraumatology.

Dr. Jehane Dagher, physiatrist at the Traumatic Brain Injury Centre at the Montreal General Hospital, conducted a study from 2011 to 2016 among 144 patients admitted to the Emergency Department, for head injuries related to cycling. “During this time we noticed up to six times longer ICU stays for patients who did not wear a helmet as well as a higher rate of mortality for these patients.”

Dr. Judith Marcoux, neurosurgeon and Medical Director of Neurotrauma at the MUHC, added, “Four out of five head injuries could be avoided if each cyclist wore a helmet, regardless of their age. It is imperative that adults lead the way by wearing a helmet.”

About the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) is one of the world’s foremost academic health facilities. Building on the tradition of medical leadership of its founding hospitals, the MUHC provides exceptional multidisciplinary patient-centric care. Affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine of McGill University and at the helm of the RUIS-McGill, the MUHC continues to shape the course of adult and pediatric medicine by attracting clinical and research expertise from around the world, assessing the latest in medical technology, and training the next generation of medical professionals. In collaboration with our network partners, we are building a better future for our patients and their families; for our employees, professionals, researchers and students; for our community and above all, for life. www.muhc.ca

Naloxone training coming to CSL First Responders

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Cote Saint-Luc EMS

With the opioide overdose crisis sweeping across Canada it was only a matter of time before widespread training of First Responders would take place. Montreal has announced its firefighters have started to receive this training. This leaves the question about Cote Saint-Luc, the only jurisdiction on the Island of Montreal with its own First Responder Service. Montreal firefighters do not respond to medical emergencies in Cote Saint-Luc.

I reached out to find out about CSL Emergency Medical Services training. Public Safety Councillor Oren Sebag confirms that CSL First Responders will indeed be trained to administer Naloxone in the case of opioide overdose.

Read More:

MONTREAL FIRST RESPONDERS TO BE TRAINED IN USE OF NALOXONE AS ‘ADDITIONAL TOOL’

“The real first responders are the people that make the call,” explains Richard Davy, a student of Social Work at McGill University. “When we consider how quickly someone can lose brain function without oxygen, these are the people that still need to be trained on how to use naloxone.”
Global
https://globalnews.ca/news/5388323/montreal-first-responders-naloxone/

Finding a better outcome in a tough situation

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Phil Anzarut

My friend Phil Anzarut shared this with me and I believe his universal message of hope and kindness is praiseworthy:

Dear friends,

Another year older, another year wiser, and most importantly, another year. I like to think that I’ve gotten a little wiser over the last few years and one thing that I’ve recently began to reflect upon is the human spirit. Can hope, motivation and a positive attitude actually generate a better outcome in a tough situation?

I’d like to share a little story with you about a fellow survivor, a 27 year old Quebec City man named Nicolas. His mom wrote to me late last year looking for help, connections and information about urachal cancer as Nicolas had recently been diagnosed and was looking for a way forward. As has become common because of my online profile, I put her in touch with the experts in my circle and made sure she was well informed as she navigated her son’s treatment options. I received an email from Nicolas’ mom in early February saying that he had finished his chemo and was quite stressed waiting for his first CT scan, but that he explicitly told her: “if Phil got through it, I can get through it.” You can imagine how touched I was by that comment.

As it turns out, your donations not only funded a urachal cancer research project, capitalized a rare cancer research fund and bought a next generation DNA sequencing machine, you’ve enabled us to give people hope, which I believe is another incredible contribution towards the fight against rare cancers.

On July 6, 2019, I will lead the Bikus Urachus team on our 7th bike ride from Montreal to Quebec City to raise funds for cancer research. Our team continues to bring tremendous awareness to urachal and other rare cancers, and we need your support.

Please help us by making a donation directly to the Urachal Cancer Research Fund at the Jewish General Hospital Foundation by clicking here: https://jghfoundation.org/en/donations/products?id=440

OR, you can donate through the Ride to Conquer Cancer by clicking the link at the bottom of the page.

Funds are put to work as they are received, so please donate today.

Thank you,

Phil

www.urachalcancer.com
Follow Bikus Urachus on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/bikusurachus/

Click here to visit my personal page.
If the text above does not appear as a clickable link, you can visit the web address:
http://www.conquercancer.ca/site/TR?px=3115536&pg=personal&fr_id=1701&s_locale=en_US&et=jB-nn2BI0Er8KUGsBbSWbw&s_tafId=472216

Click here to view the team page for Bikus Urachus
If the text above does not appear as a clickable link, you can visit the web address:
http://www.conquercancer.ca/site/TR?team_id=81420&pg=team&fr_id=1701&s_locale=en_US&et=eatDoiYvhyhE_t0KgrYcFw&s_tafId=472216

7 Effective Strategies for Getting into the Best Shape of Your Life

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Barry_Nashen_Best-shape-of-your-life

 

My brother Barry is an unrelenting work-out fanatic, a seasoned, even professional, travel adventurer and a healthy-lifestyle driven character. He has spent years fine-tuning his control over mind, body and soul. Having dispatched his travel postcards from all corners of the globe for the past decade over 150 friends have repeatedly suggested that he write a book.

After two months of laser-focused effort, he has written and published his first ever book on Amazon, entitled: 7 Effective Strategies for Getting into the Best Shape of Your Life.

2018-11-04 001.jpg

Nicole and Jeremy Nashen with their uncle Barry Nashen on top of Mont St. Hilaire. Nov. 2018.

Good physical health, experiences, and friendships correlate with life satisfaction and overall happiness. However, the population is becoming ever more overweight and sedentary. Barry outlines seven motivators to energize your desire or ambition for feeling great. As you are a unique individual, the motivation that will inspire you may well be different from what will incite your friend. As an illustration, is it goal-setting or music that influences you best? Discover the motivation that sparks your enthusiasm.

“I have written a couple of dozen two-page travel postcards over the past decade. After much encouragement from my readers, I decided that it was finally time to write a book. How much more challenging can it be?”, Barry mused.

Barry_Nashen_Croatia_Split_2015

Barry Nashen hiking in Croatia. 2015.

“After two months of concentration during the evenings, I published my first-ever book about motivation, couched in a guide for getting into great physical shape,” he said.

In order to impact the most people as possible with his effort, he has made his book available to download for a mere US$2.99 (or CAD $10.99 in paperback).  “If you enjoy my book leave a heartfelt review,” Barry said. “And it is completely free for Kindle Unlimited subscribers!”

The book is only 20 pages, you can easily read it in a half hour.

In Canada:
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07P8KNW7T/ref=sr_1_1…

In the USA:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07P8KNW7T/ref=sr_1_1…

 

Barry_Nashen_Spartan_Beast_2015

Barry Nashen captures his first Spartan Beast in 2015

“I am certain you will enjoy reading my book,” Barry told me. “It is full of fun facts! And please re-post this request to your FB friends? Imagine if all your out-of-shape acquaintances become fit and healthy thanks to your re-post!”

And what’s next for Barry? “With your encouragement, I am planning on writing another, maybe a mystery novel!”

Barry_Nashen_Portugal_2018

Barry Nashen hikes and bikes the Portuguese coast in 2018

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