How will we recognize police without clown pants?

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Montreal police dressed in militia gear blocking city hall doors (Source: Sun Media)

Montreal police dressed in militia gear blocking city hall doors (Source: Sun Media)

Police who continue to sport camouflage pants on duty could face fines of $500 to $3,000 for each day they wear them under new legislation proposed by the Liberal government, reports the Montreal Gazette.

After three useless, sad years of vandalism of police cars (and fire trucks and ambulances with union stickers) and wearing camouflage and clown pants, the government has finally awoken to put an end to this lawless fashion flap.

I said early on that it was not fair to claw back on pensions that were already agreed to and that any changes ought to affect new officers or else be renegotiated within their collective agreements.

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Montreal Police in camouflage pants (Photo: McGill Daily)

 

Forget that there are so many police officers earning in excess of $100,000 per year and the time-and-a-half pay for standing at intersections pushing traffic buttons, three times the going rate for trained civilians. These folks put their lives on the line, after-all, to protect us and deserve to be reasonably well paid for doing so. And they normally deserve our respect and appreciation.

But, their protest have gone much too far. Three years were three years too long.

They also should have no right to deface their patrol cars. Same for the firefighters and Urgences Santé ambulance technicians. This is public property and no one has the right to cause such damage without penalty. If you did it you’d be held accountable. Why not them?
These public safety professionals have caused immeasurable harm to their own brand. They have lost respect from the public they serve. People laughed at first the they ignored the outlandish uniforms altogether. How sad.
What kind of a message was that for our children? Shameful, I say.
And the proposed legislation doesn’t go far enough. What about the cars and trucks and ambulances?  What about our firefighters and ambulance techs? And what about our local public security forces? Hopefully these folks will finally understand it’s time to pull up their pants – their uniform pants – and start off their next shift while putting their best foot forward. It’s time to earn back the respect they lost.
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Montreal Police officers in “clown” pants. (Photo: Canoe.com)

 

Read my previous posts:

Police and firefighters should wear their own pants

Painting fire trucks black endangers the public

Police seek more potential victims after sexual assault, kidnapping arrest

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CTV Montreal 

Published Friday, March 10, 2017 4:04PM EST 

Last Updated Friday, March 10, 2017 9:54PM EST

Montreal police are looking for any potential victims of a 35-year-old man who is facing charges of sexual assault and abduction.

Adamo Bono was arrested on Tuesday in connection with an incident that occurred in Cote-St-Luc on March 2.

A 24-year-old woman said she was on an STM bus heading west on Van Horne Ave. at about 6:40 p.m. when the suspect got on. She told police he sat down next to her and constantly stared at her throughout the ride.

Adamo Bono, 35, was arrested Tuesday for sexual assault and kidnapping.

When she got to her stop, the woman said the suspect got off the bus with her and followed her, trying to start a conversation. She ignored him.

When she got off the bus at Kildare St. and Cavendish Blvd. near her destination, she said the man grabbed her and dragged her into a wooded area where he assaulted her, said Daniel Lacoursiere, who said the suspect is not known to police.

The woman said she managed to escape and run to a building where a friend of hers lives and the suspect followed her, leaving only when the victim’s friend answered the door.

Adamo appeared in court Thursday to face the charges.

“Investigators from the sexual assault division were able to get some video footage of the suspect in the metro and that’s how they were able to identify him, so that’s what led to the arrest,” said Lacoursiere.

Investigators say they have good reason to believe the man could have had other victims.

Anyone who may have been assaulted by Adamo Bono is urged to contact their neighbourhood police station or call 9-1-1 to file a formal complaint.
Watch the CTV News report

Car break-ins continue to be problem in Police Station 9 area

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Dec. 13, 2016 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

Dec. 13, 2016 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

Heading south? vCOP will watch your home while you’re away

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If you’re bags are packed and your ready to go, you should ask a trusted neighbour or friend to do periodic spot checks of your home. You can also use the free Vacation Spot Check service from the Côte Saint-Luc Volunteer Citizens on Patrol, or vCOP.

The service is available to residents of single-family homes, semi-detached homes, duplexes and townhouses.

 

vCOP logo

Here’s how it works.

vCOP members will visit your home and check for signs of forced entry, like broken windows, open doors, or torn screens. If anything appears suspicious, public security and police are notified right away. And, a call is made to the contact number you leave us.

They’ll also remove flyers, circulars and newspapers from the front steps. They won’t take away your mail. You’ll need a trusted neighbour or friend for that, or you can ask Canada Post to hold your mail while you’re away.

If your side and back yards are accessible, the vCOP members will walk around you property and inspect those areas, too.

To sign up for this free service, complete this form.

As the founder of vCOP 10 years ago and City Councillor responsible for this incredible service I am so pleased to have these invaluable services rolled out to our residents. After a few months of Vacation Spot Check we have received positive feedback. A big thank you to our patrollers and to Team Leader Morris Stelcner for taking charge of this project.

For more information, email vcop@cotesaintluc.org or call 514-485-6800 ext. 5101.

vCOP_Nashen_La Presse_ 2015-11-02

Côte Saint-Luc vCOP smoke detector brigade going door to door

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smoke_detectorFor the fifth consecutive year, members of the Côte Saint-Luc volunteer Citizens on Patrol (vCOP) smoke detector brigade are ringing door bells and offering to check smoke detectors and replacing dead batteries where needed.

The smoke detector brigade recently completed the south-east corner of the city including Borden, Randall, Alpine and Pinedale Avenues and surrounding east-west streets. It is now moving on to David Lewis and surrounding streets near the Décarie Square area.

“Smoke detectors save lives by warning people of possible fires in a home, but they can only do the job if they are working,” Mayor Mitchell Brownstein said. “Too many deaths occur that could have been prevented if the house was equipped with a working smoke detector.”

vCOP Smoke Detector Brigade goes door to door inspecting mandatory smoke detectors and will go so far as to install a new one (Photo: Martin Chamberland, La Presse)

vCOP Smoke Detector Brigade goes door to door inspecting mandatory smoke detectors and will go so far as to install a new one (Photo: Martin Chamberland, La Presse)

This initiative is done in partnership with the Montreal fire department. Smoke detector brigade volunteers will be wearing vCOP uniforms and carry a photo ID. If you are not home when they visit, they will leave a notice with information on how to schedule a visit. This is a free service.

 

“Once again, our vCOP teams are providing another level of preventative safety to residents,” said Councillor Glenn J. Nashen, who is the council member responsible for vCOP. “Whether they are checking smoke detectors, spotting garage doors left open, or watching out for homes of vacationers, our vCOP volunteers are helping Côte Saint-Luc remain one of the safest cities on the island.”
Côte Saint-Luc has a long history of fire prevention, including By-law 1556 requires smoke detectors in all new homes and buildings, which was adopted in 1977.

Police warn all citizens of jewelry thefts in public spaces

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Free Press | Aug. 30, 2016 | Click to enlarge

Free Press | Aug. 30, 2016 | Click to enlarge

URGENT: Jewellery Theft Alert from Police Station 9 – Appel à la vigilance

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montreal_police_car

Montréal, August 25th 2016– The Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) would like to warn all citizens to exercise caution in order to prevent the theft of jewellery being perpetrated by con artists in public places.

THIEVE’S METHOD

  • The thief acts alone or as part of a group.
  • The thief uses false pretences to get close to you (talks about a deceased family member, asks for the way to the hospital, asks for the time).
  • The thief then offers you a piece of jewellery of no value.
  • The thief comes in closer to get you to try on the jewellery.
  • At the same time, the thief steals your valuable jewellery without your knowledge.
  • The theft is not noticed until later.

 

PREVENTION TIPS

  • Travel in a group whenever possible.
  • Hide your valuable jewellery until you reach your destination.
  • Refuse a gift from a stranger and do not let that person come close to you.

 

RESOURCES

If you are a victim of fraud or theft, or if you think you might be, immediately contact the following resources for help:

Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) – 911

Elder Abuse Help Line: 1-888-489-2287

Tel-Aînés: 514-353-2463

Canadian Anti-Fraud Center: 1-888-495-8501

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Appel à la vigilance pour prévenir le vol de bijoux

plus particulièrement les personnes aînées

 

 

Montréal, le 25 août 2016 – Le Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) fait appel à la vigilance des citoyens pour prévenir le vol de bijoux par des arnaqueurs dans des lieux publics.

MÉTHODE UTILISÉE PAR LE VOLEUR

  • Le voleur agit seul ou en groupe.
  • Il utilise différents faux prétextes pour approcher la victime (parle d’un membre de sa famille qui est décédé, demande le chemin de l’hôpital, demande l’heure).
  • Il vous offre ensuite un bijou qui n’a aucune valeur.
  • Il s’approche de vous pour vous faire essayer le bijou.
  • Au même moment, il subtilise à votre insu vos bijoux de valeur.
  • Le vol n’est remarqué que plus tard.

 

PRÉVENTION

  • Privilégiez de circuler en groupe.
  • Cachez vos bijoux de valeur jusqu’à leur destination.
  • Refusez le cadeau d’un inconnu et ne le laissez pas s’approcher de vous.

 

 

Si vous êtes victime d’une fraude ou d’un vol, ou pensez l’être, n’hésitez pas à contacter les ressources suivantes pour obtenir de l’aide :

 

 

 

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