Car break-ins continue to be problem in Police Station 9 area

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Dec. 13, 2016 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

Dec. 13, 2016 | Free Press | Click to enlarge

A teacher-student bond 45 years later

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Sargent Lawrence Sager, Toronto Police Service, 32 Division

Sargent Lawrence Sager, Toronto Police Service, 32 Division

Here’s a ‘schmaltzy’ story I picked up off my old friend Laurie’s Facebook page. Laurie, or Sargent Lawrence Sager, as he is officially known in the Toronto Police Service (TPS), is a son of District 6 in Cote Saint-Luc. Growing up in the late 60s and 70s in CSL, he attended Westminster Elementary School and went on to Wagar High School. He was a neighbourhood buddy of mine and eventually we volunteered together at CSL Emergency Measures Organization.

After graduating McGill University Laurie went on to join the RCMP, eventually moving to Toronto and joining the TPS, where he has served with distinction for over 27 years.

Lawrence penned these words a few days ago:

Last June, while performing my sworn duties out on the road, I received a phone call from a woman, who identified herself as Gloria Price. Ms. Price is an elementary school teacher who teaches out of Pleasant Public School in the same area that I police. She referred to me as Laurie, a name that I hadn’t heard in 40 years. You see, Ms. Price started her teaching career in 1970 at Westminster School, located in Cote St Luc, where I grew up. I happened to go to Westminster School and my Grade 2 teacher, 45 years ago was Ms. Price.

From my telephone conversation I was somewhat skeptical that the caller was the same lady that taught me, all those years ago, but incredibly, she described me exactly the way I looked back then. Needless to say, school was out for the summer, so I told her that when school reconvenes in September, I would stop by to see her.

Grade 2 student Laurie Sager with teacher, Miss Price, Westminster School, Cote Saint-Luc, 1970.

Grade 2 student Laurie Sager with teacher, Miss Price, Westminster School, Cote Saint-Luc, 1970.

This morning, upon my arrival at the school, we finally reconnected. It was an emotional experience as I was a student of hers at the beginning of her career and after 45 long years she’s still going strong. Back then I was 7 years old and an awkward, scrawny shrimp of a kid, who she was kind enough to remember over the years and countless students. It was great seeing her again. I happened to be standing on a bench in the last row, next to her in the class picture so I thought I would take another just to show what 45 years looks like.

Sargent Lawrence Sager with teacher Miss Price, 45 years later in Toronto

Sargent Lawrence Sager with teacher Miss Price, 45 years later in Toronto

What a fabulous story and chance encounter that ties in so well with the recent launch of the CSL Historical Society where we seek to share memories and photos of earlier days in our city.

Former EMO member (and another old friend of mine and Laurie’s), Patti-Beth Leitman, had this to say: “WOW!!! What a GREAT story and you BOTH look fabulous!! Both ageing very well!!”

Another fellow CSL EMO volunteer from way back, Mitchell Sinclair, said, “She was my teacher as well in grade two, one year after you. Small world.”

Thanks for sharing this story Laurie. I’m proud of your accomplishments and to call you my friend for so many years.

Now, how many others remember Ms. Price from Westminster School in the 70s? Or Laurie? Please do share your memories.

Police warn all citizens of jewelry thefts in public spaces

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Free Press | Aug. 30, 2016 | Click to enlarge

Free Press | Aug. 30, 2016 | Click to enlarge

Natural gas leak disrupts central Cote Saint-Luc

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Emergency crews respond to natural gas leak at Parkhaven and Kildare in Cote Saint-Luc (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

Emergency crews respond to natural gas leak at Parkhaven and Kildare in Cote Saint-Luc (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

UPDATED Aug. 30, 2016 22:20

A ruptured natural gas line disrupted a normal, quiet afternoon in Cote Saint-Luc today. Just before 5:00 P.M. calls started coming in from residents in the area of Parkhaven and Kildare about the smell of gas. I was passing the intersection of Cavendish and Kildare at 5:00 P.M. and noticed the distinct rotten-egg sulfuric smell. Emergency services were called and began arriving moments later.

CSL volunteer Citizens o Patrol maintain perimeter around gas leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

CSL volunteer Citizens o Patrol maintain perimeter around gas leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

Cote Saint-Luc Public Safety Director was one of the first on scene and quickly dispatched his Public Security agents to close off the area and evacuate residents within close proximity to the construction site at Kildare and Parkhaven.

As close as we can safely get to the scene of the leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

As close as we can safely get to the scene of the leak (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

CSL volunteer Citizens on Patrol was also activated and several teams quickly responded to assist in securing a perimeter to safeguard the immediate sector for several responding Montreal Fire Department vehicles. Police services also responded along with an Urgences Santé supervisor and CSL Emergency Medical Services. Within a short while Gaz Met crews also showed up on scene to assess the situation. Hydro Quebec emergency crews showed up and began cutting power to the immediate area and as far west as Blossom Ave.

vCOP detour traffic off of Kildare onto Wildwood (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

vCOP detour traffic off of Kildare onto Wildwood (Photo: Sidney Benizri)

By 6:30 P.M. I saw some fire crews leaving the area. By 7:30 P.M. some power was returning to the outer perimeter.

At 9:30 P.M. Gaz Met capped the leak and the fire department has begun house to house inspections. Once complete the road will be reopened and Hydro Quebec crews will be able to restore power.

As of 10:20 P.M. all power and water are reported to have been restored.

 

Gaz leak Parkhaven Kildare Photo Sidney Benizri 2016-08-30 006

CSL personnel and senior management were on scene coordinating local services and assessing damage. Mayor Mitchell Brownstein was in constant contact with staff. City Manager Nadia Di Furia and Assistant Manager Jonathan Shecter remain on scene as of this posting to coordinate with Reichson. Joining them are Urban Development Director Charles Senekal and Manager Mohammed Ali.  These two engineers know every inch of the city and are extremely helpful in this situation in organizing the response for underground services such as water supply. As work crews will begin digging up the road this evening, Senekal and Ali will work with water engineering company Sima, to minimize any disruption. While some local streets may have their water cut, PS and vCOP will begin distribution of bottled water, as per our emergency procedures.

“We have a fantastic team and I am proud to be standing here with them,” City Manager Di Furia stated.

Councillor Sidney Benizri, who lives a few houses away from the scene provided the pictures in this blog post.”It looks like tonight we need to be patient. All the teams are at work here and they’ve handled the situation very professionally,” said Benizri, who is still without power as of this posting.

Evacuated residents take shelter in Montreal Fire Department bus

Evacuated residents take shelter in Montreal Fire Department bus

Councillor Dida Berku reported that the Cavendish Mall food court was packed due to the power outage.

Many thanks to Director Reichson, Public Security agents, senior management, and all emergency personnel from Montreal, Gaz Met and Hydro Quebec for quickly bringing the situation under control and keeping our residents safe.

As Cote Saint-Lucers we are truly fortunate to have a dedicated staff and a city council so committed to our residents. Each city councillor gets involved side by side with our members of staff to ensure our residents are safe and sound. Tonight was no exception as mayor and councillors immediately began emailing, texting and calling to check on the situation and to receive frequent updates.

Gaz leak Parkhaven Kildare Photo Sidney Benizri 2016-08-30 005

 

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CBC News

URGENT: Jewellery Theft Alert from Police Station 9 – Appel à la vigilance

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montreal_police_car

Montréal, August 25th 2016– The Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) would like to warn all citizens to exercise caution in order to prevent the theft of jewellery being perpetrated by con artists in public places.

THIEVE’S METHOD

  • The thief acts alone or as part of a group.
  • The thief uses false pretences to get close to you (talks about a deceased family member, asks for the way to the hospital, asks for the time).
  • The thief then offers you a piece of jewellery of no value.
  • The thief comes in closer to get you to try on the jewellery.
  • At the same time, the thief steals your valuable jewellery without your knowledge.
  • The theft is not noticed until later.

 

PREVENTION TIPS

  • Travel in a group whenever possible.
  • Hide your valuable jewellery until you reach your destination.
  • Refuse a gift from a stranger and do not let that person come close to you.

 

RESOURCES

If you are a victim of fraud or theft, or if you think you might be, immediately contact the following resources for help:

Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) – 911

Elder Abuse Help Line: 1-888-489-2287

Tel-Aînés: 514-353-2463

Canadian Anti-Fraud Center: 1-888-495-8501

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Appel à la vigilance pour prévenir le vol de bijoux

plus particulièrement les personnes aînées

 

 

Montréal, le 25 août 2016 – Le Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) fait appel à la vigilance des citoyens pour prévenir le vol de bijoux par des arnaqueurs dans des lieux publics.

MÉTHODE UTILISÉE PAR LE VOLEUR

  • Le voleur agit seul ou en groupe.
  • Il utilise différents faux prétextes pour approcher la victime (parle d’un membre de sa famille qui est décédé, demande le chemin de l’hôpital, demande l’heure).
  • Il vous offre ensuite un bijou qui n’a aucune valeur.
  • Il s’approche de vous pour vous faire essayer le bijou.
  • Au même moment, il subtilise à votre insu vos bijoux de valeur.
  • Le vol n’est remarqué que plus tard.

 

PRÉVENTION

  • Privilégiez de circuler en groupe.
  • Cachez vos bijoux de valeur jusqu’à leur destination.
  • Refusez le cadeau d’un inconnu et ne le laissez pas s’approcher de vous.

 

 

Si vous êtes victime d’une fraude ou d’un vol, ou pensez l’être, n’hésitez pas à contacter les ressources suivantes pour obtenir de l’aide :

 

 

 

CSL speed trailer warns you to slow down, obey limit

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Cote Saint-Luc's speed trailer deployed on Cavendish Blvd. (July 2016. Source: CSL)

Cote Saint-Luc’s speed trailer deployed on Cavendish Blvd. (July 2016. Source: CSL)

A speed trailer (pictured above) is shared between the municipalities of Cote Saint-Luc, Hampstead and Montreal West. This summer it has been deployed in several locations in CSL, including Cavendish northbound, coming out of the underpass, and southbound at Merton. The speed limit sign at the top of the trailer is changeable according to our local streets: 30, 40 and 50 km/h.

The trailer will be situated at different locations throughout the city for a week at each time.

Local police station PDQ9 may send out an officer to issue tickets in these, or any other location, so you are advised to slow down.

CSL Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson, responsible for this valuable traffic calming device when on our territory is very responsive to complaints by residents. While speed is a police matter, our Public Safety team will be out there as additional eyes and ears and advise police of trouble spots on our territory.

Drive safely. Slow down. And watch out for pedestrians.

 

Brave effort in deep end by CSL personnel 

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Last week Cote Saint-Luc emergency personnel responded to a call for assistance at a condo swimming pool on Rembrandt Ave. Upon arrival a swimmer was seen motionless at the bottom of the deep end.

Cote Saint-Luc Public Safety Director Jordy Reichson was first on scene and immediately removed his heavy utility belt carrying his radio and other tools, emptied his pockets, removed his safety boots and jumped into the pool. He was quickly joined by Public Security Agent Sebastien Payette. Together they managed to  bring the person to the surface and remove him from the water and begin resuscitation.

EMS, police and Urgences Santé technicians arrived and continued reanimation efforts. Unfortunately attempts to revive the man in his 60s were unsuccessful and he was declared dead on scene.

This tragic event serves as a critical reminder that one should never, ever swim alone.

I have recommended that the city produce and distribute signs to this effect to all condo and apartments with swimming pools.

Jordy Reichson spoke before the CSL Men’s Club a few days later and reminded the participants of the importance of having at least one other person present when swimming at a semi-private pool.

Thank you to Reichson and Payette for their brave efforts. As emergency responders they never know what the next call will bring. To be sure, jumping into the deep end of a pool, full clothed, and dragging someone out of the water is no easy task, indeed it is very dangerous. Thank you to all those other responders who did their utmost to revive this swimmer. And deepest condolences to the family and friends of the victim.

To our residents in apartments and condos, please remember to be safe every time you go swimming by having someone else close by in case of emergency.

ANSI-Water-Safety-Sign-AWE-7790_150

 

 

Fre Press | July 12, 2016 | Click to enlarge

Fre Press | July 12, 2016 | Click to enlarge

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