CSL Golden Shuttle to Walmart Lasalle?

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Côte Saint-Luc seniors want STM shuttle service extended

Group says adding 5 minutes to current route would make a big difference

CBC News Posted: Jul 12, 2017 

A group of seniors in Côte Saint-Luc are asking the STM to extend a shuttle bus service that runs to Angrignon mall.

A group of seniors in Côte Saint-Luc are asking the STM to extend a

shuttle bus service that runs to Angrignon mall. (Simon Nakonechny/CBC)

A group of seniors from Côte Saint-Luc say they rely on the STM shuttle bus service that goes to Carrefour Angrignon shopping centre, but right now, it doesn’t go far enough.

The current route drops passengers off in the mall parking lot, making it more difficult to access nearby big box stores on the other side of a busy intersection on foot.

“To cross the Angrignon Boulevard, you take your life into your hands,” said Maureen Deery, a resident of St. Patrick Square, an apartment community for those 55 and up on Côte St-Luc Road.

As it stands, the shuttle’s last stop is at the mall. The group wants the STM to add a stop in front of the Walmart across the street. From there, they would have easier access to other big box stores.

The proposed stop would be about a kilometre away, which doesn’t seem far, but it’s a long way to walk for those who aren’t as spry as they used to be.

Shuttle provides ‘vital access’

The bus line is one of the STM’s last remaining “Navette Or” services designated specifically for seniors. It only runs three times a week and many passengers use it to get all their shopping done in one trip.

“The shuttle is a vital access,” Deery told CBC Montreal’s Daybreak.

csl seniors

The group of women live in the same apartment building and

use the shuttle service frequently. (Simon Nakonechny/CBC)

Another St. Patrick Square resident, Jackie MacDonnell, says crossing the six-lane intersection, especially when loaded up with heavy shopping bags, can be a struggle.

“It’s hard to get to Walmart because it’s quite a long walk, we have to cross busy streets and all that,” she told CBC.

Some of the users have been pushing for the change since 2015, and even submitted a petition.

The STM declined to give an interview on the topic but did issue a statement saying that there’s a moratorium on changing seniors’ shuttle bus routes and that no changes were being considered for the 262.

‘Huge gain for the seniors’

Côte Saint-Luc city councillor Dida Berku told CBC that she plans to put pressure on the STM to reconsider.

The proposed change would mean “a minor modification for a huge gain for the seniors,” she said.

csl shuttle

Some of the 262 bus users peruse the schedule.

They have been asking for the new stop for two years, with no success. (CBC)

 

Berku said the extra five minutes could be easily accommodated by cutting another, rarely used stop on the 262 line.

“It wouldn’t take much to simply modify the route,” she said. “This is why this shuttle was created.”

With files from Simon Nakonechny, CBC’s Daybreak

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The City of Cote Saint-Luc strongly supports this request. Indeed, we have been in contact with the Montreal Transit Corporation / STM over the last few years to expand the Golden Shuttle service from CSL to reach more shopping centres as well as the hospital district. So far, they have not acceded to our requests.

Citizen reporter discovers rookie hero

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Our lives can be changed in an instant due to circumstances well beyond our control. Complete strangers can be brought together in ways we could never imagine.
Such was the case for three complete strangers last Saturday morning. The story below describes an incredible situation, a dramatic rescue, an amazing tale of three lives that became intertwined in a flash.
The experience that Linda Toulch had can best be described as once-in-a-lifetime. Had it not been for Linda’s acute or chance observation on that fateful morning we might never have known of the bravery of rookie police officer Rafael Bealieu.
And even more amazingly, the life of a struggling individual could have ended within seconds had it not been for the miraculous intervention by this would-be rookie cop hero.
Hats off to Linda, citizen reporter,  for doing her part in telling this amazing story. Chapeau to officer Bealieu for his quick thinking, rapid response and bravery in the face of endangering his own life which saved the life of this helpless, sinking victim.  And thank goodness that this unnamed victim, in her own car on a Montreal street will have these two wonderful people, Linda and Rafael to remember in such a remarkable way for the rest of her hopefully healthy and less-eventful life.

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Montreal rookie cop “a hero” says woman who witnessed flash flood rescue

Montreal police Const. Rafael Beaulieu, left, and partner Simon Lavoie outside police station 26 on Monday July 10, 2017. The Montreal police constables made a dramatic rescue on Victoria Ave. Saturday.
Montreal police Const. Rafael Beaulieu, left, and partner Simon Lavoie outside police station 26 on Monday July 10, 2017. The Montreal police constables made a dramatic rescue on Victoria Ave. Saturday. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

“I didn’t want to be filming a death. I just couldn’t take that.”

It was 6:30 a.m. Saturday, the rain was still coming down and Linda Toulch had tried to call 911 to tell them what she had seen from the window of her 10th-storey condo moments before — a car travelling along Victoria Ave., stopped by traffic beneath an underpass, waiting for the light to change. But as it waited, water began to cascade into the underpass, accumulate and rise.

Toulch had stayed on the line with 911 for a few minutes before hanging up after getting no reply. She presumed the emergency call centre was getting swamped with calls related to the torrential rains that were hitting the city as a system of thunderstorms rolled through Montreal. And so, picking up her iPad, she joined her husband at their window and began to record what was happening on the street below.

She recorded as the waters rose past the vehicle’s tires, then approached its trunk. She recorded as a Montreal police car pulled up at the water’s edge and two officers exited the vehicle. But as it became clear the car wasn’t going to move because its engine had been flooded and, with it, any power to open the windows to let the driver escape, as it became clear the vehicle was on the verge of being completely submerged, Toulch stopped recording.

“I didn’t want to witness a drowning so I just put down the iPad,” she said. But as she did so, her husband, watching the scene through a pair of high-power binoculars, told her: “Look what’s happening now.”

What happened was one of the two Montreal policers who had pulled up to the underpass took off his gun belt, handed it to his partner, grabbed his baton and jumped into the waters slowly engulfing the car.

“(The police officer) didn’t think the water was going to be over his head,” said Toulch. “My husband could see his expression. He was like shocked, he almost went under. But he came back up, swam over to the car.

The officer who headed into the water, 23-year-old Const. Rafael Beaulieu, a police officer only since May, said Monday he and his partner Simon Lavoie only noticed the woman’s predicament by chance.

“We were heading for an assignment downtown when we saw cars doing U-turns on Victoria Ave.,” he said. “When we saw what was happening (in the underpass), the first thing we did was block off the road with our squad car.”

Beaulieu said he could see the female driver in the back seat of the car and called out to her before swimming toward the vehicle. He then used his baton to smash in the rear window of the vehicle and hauled the woman out. In the end, the only injury recorded was the one he suffered.

“She couldn’t swim and she was holding onto my bulletproof vest pretty tight,” he said. “The water was so high I couldn’t touch the bottom, so I grabbed onto the edge of the (broken) window. I cut my hand, but it was minor.”

Handing the woman over to his partner, Beaulieu made sure there was no one else in the car before returning to relatively dry land.

Once Urgences-santé arrived and the paperwork was filled out, both officers returned to the station, showered, changed uniforms and then returned to their assignment downtown.

Despite the fact she was 10 storeys above the rescue, Toulch was so impressed by Beaulieu’s actions that when 911 finally called back to ask why she had called, she told the operator what she had seen.

“He could have been swept under the car, that glass could have cut his face … I said, ‘The policeman is a hero, and he should be rewarded with a medal.’”

After being put in touch with Montreal police, Toulch repeated her praise for the officer and sent them the video she had recorded on Saturday. On Monday, she and her husband paid a visit to Beaulieu at Station 26, which serves Côte-des-Neiges West, to thank him.

“I figured you hear so many negative things about the police,” she said. “This is a feel-good story.”

Côte Saint-Luc will save $4.8 million thanks to fairer funding formula for island-wide service | Des économies de 4,8 millions $ pour Côte Saint-Luc grâce à une formule de financement plus équitable pour les services d’agglomération

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Côte Saint-Luc will save $4.8 million thanks to fairer funding formula for island-wide service
The City of Côte Saint-Luc as part of the Association of Suburban Municipalities has negotiated a $4.8 million reduction in its share of payments to the agglomeration of Montreal for island-wide services over over the next three years–savings that can be used to fund local programs, pay down our debt and reduce taxes by paying less interest on debt.
“The new formula will allow us to keep more money in Côte Saint-Luc for programs and services that our residents value as well as allow us to reduce our debt and our overall tax rate,” Mayor Mitchell Brownstein said. “It is extremely good news.”
The ASM has argued for years that the percentages were not fair. Mayor Denis Coderre must be commended for being a fair partner in the City of Montreal that worked with us to find a fairer formula.
Côte Saint-Luc will continue to pay into the island-wide Agglomeration of Montreal for services like police, fire, and public transit but at a lower rate.
Thanks to an agreement between the City of Montreal and the Association of Suburban Municipalities, the formula is changing. As a result, Côte Saint-Luc will be sending less money to the Agglomeration than we do today: $798,541 less in 2017, $1,597,081 less in 2018 and $2,395,622 less in 2019. That’s a savings of between 3 percent to 8 percent each year, compared to what Côte Saint-Luc previously paid the Agglomeration.
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Des économies de 4,8 millions $ pour Côte Saint-Luc grâce à une formule de financement plus équitable pour les services d’agglomération
La Ville de Côte Saint-Luc, de concert avec l’Association des municipalités de banlieue, a négocié une réduction de 4,8 millions $ de sa quote-part à l’agglomération de Montréal pour les services fournis à l’ensemble de l’île au cours des trois prochaines années – des économies qui pourront être utilisées pour financer les programmes locaux, payer notre dette et réduire les taxes en payant moins d’intérêt sur la dette.
« La nouvelle formule nous permettra de garder plus d’argent à Côte Saint-Luc pour les programmes et les services que nos résidants apprécient et elle nous aidera à réduire notre taux de taxation global, a dit le maire Mitchell Brownstein. C’est une excellente nouvelle. »
L’AMB soutient depuis des années que les pourcentages ne sont pas équitables. Le maire Denis Coderre, qui mérite d’ailleurs d’être félicité en tant que partenaire honnête à la Ville de Montréal, a travaillé avec nous afin de mettre au point une formule plus équitable.
Côte Saint-Luc continuera de payer sa part à l’agglomération de l’île de Montréal pour les services tels que la police, la protection incendie et les transports publics, mais à un taux inférieur.
Grâce à un accord entre la Ville de Montréal et l’Association des municipalités de banlieue, une nouvelle formule a été établie. Ainsi, les versements de Côte Saint-Luc à l’agglomération seront inférieurs à ceux que nous faisons actuellement : 798 541 $ de moins en 2017, 1 597 081 $ de moins en 2018 et 2 395 622 $ de moins en 2019. Cela représente des économies de 3 à 8 % chaque année, par rapport à ce que Côte Saint-Luc payait à l’agglomération jusqu’ici.

Prestigious D’Arcy McGee citizenship medals presented

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It was my honour to attend this weeks ceremony by D’Arcy McGee MNA David Birnbaum at the CSL Aquatic and Community Center.

The ceremony was set up three years ago by the engaging and charismatic Birnbaum to honour exceptional citizens for their outstanding contribution to society, in particular affecting those of us residing in the D’Arcy McGee riding, which includes Cote saint-Luc, Hampstead and Snowdon west.

This year’s winners were Baruch Cohen, Susan Wener and (posthumously) Jean Lapierre. Jean’s daughter graciously accepted the award. In addition, the Victor C. Goldbloom ‘Vivre Ensemble’ essay contest winner was Reisa Gilfix (Grade 10, Herzliah High School).

The ceremony also included a video presentation by Quebec Pemier Philippe Couillard.

An excellent jazz combo ensemble entertained the crowd from the Saint-Luc secondary school.

Baruch Cohen, left, is feted on his 90th birthday by well-wisher Frederick Krantz, founder and director of the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research. (Photo CJN)

Baruch Cohen
Baruch Cohen recently celebrated his 97th birthday. During the second world war, Baruch survived pogroms, anti-Semitism, state-sponsored tyranny and forced labour camps in Romania. He escaped to Israel and later made a life here in Montreal with Sonia, his wife of 73 years. Upon retirement from his position as a financial officer, Baruch completed a Master’s Degree in Jewish Studies. He subsequently devoted 30 years of volunteer service as Research Chair of the the Canadian Institute for Jewish Research. He spearheaded the first holocaust commemoration in memory of Jews killed in Romania and Transnistria 23 years ago, an event that continues to be held annually.

Susan Wener (Photo: The Georgia Straight)

Susan Wener

For 30 years, Susan Wener has dedicated her life to helping others. She is a therapist for people struggling with life-threatening illness. She speaks across Canada at literary festivals, medical conferences, universities and libraries, touching on subjects such as the doctor-patient relationship, integrative cancer care, overcoming obstacles and other topics related to health and well-being. Following a near death experience at 18, Susan knew that her mission would be to work with the gravely ill. She hasn’t looked back since. Her moving memoir, “Resilience” and recent Tedx Talk have reached thousands, far beyond our community’s borders.

 

Jean Lapierre

Jean Lapierre was a former member of Parliament, minister and political analyst on English and French radio and television. He died tragically along with four members of his family in a plane crash into 2016. Lapierre made perhaps his greatest mark in a final career as political analyst. He did regular spots that topped the ratings on Radio 98.5, CJAD, CTV, TVA and other media outlets. His commentaries garnered huge audiences in English and in French, and inevitably elicited reactions from politicians, other journalists as well as regular watchers across the province, who reacted to his daily scoops and analyses and discussions around the water cooler and supper table. What happens in Quebec City and Ottawa can sometimes seem remote and isolated from our lives in CSL, Hampstead and western Montreal. Jean Lapierre made it less so. He deserves our recognition for enriching our lives and widening our horizons.

Congratulations to the winners and the family of Jean C. Lapierre for this well-deserved honour.

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New life breathed into decades-old dream of a Cavendish extension

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After many stalled attempts over the last 80 years, the city of Montreal once again appears to be taking steps to make the extension of Cavendish Blvd. a reality.

The extension of the roadway to link Côte-St-Luc to St-Laurent has been talked about since the 1940s, but a new housing development could provide an impetus to complete it.

On Monday, the city sent out a public notice that Finance Minister Carlos Leitão would hold a news conference that afternoon at City Hall with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre and Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-de-Grâce borough mayor Russell Copeman about the land formerly occupied by the Blue Bonnets horse racing track (later called the Hippodrome). However, as is so often the case with the Cavendish extension, the news conference itself was postponed to another date, as Coderre was testifying before the Chamberland Commission looking into police spying into journalists and his testimony took longer than expected.

Snowdon councillor Marvin Rotrand said the city has been waiting since 2012 for the province to cede the land so it could build a project with at least 5,000 housing units on the 43.5-hectare property.

“The development of the Hippodrome site is part of the city’s plan to develop near heavy transit, and keep people from leaving the island for the suburbs,” Rotrand said.

Rotrand said because the area around Jean-Talon St. at Décarie Blvd is already heavily congested, the extension of Cavendish Blvd. is needed in order not to add more strain to the existing road network.

Rotrand expects a deal with the province to be announced shortly so it can come to a vote at the coming June city council meeting.

While the city and the province came to an agreement on ceding the land in 2012, the file has stalled, said Rotrand, who speculated it was because both levels of government had to iron out terms on the Cavendish extension.

“Part of the deal (with the province to cede the land) was that the city fund part of the Cavendish extension, but while it was put into the city’s capital budget, we never got matching funds from the province,” Rotrand said.

Also on Monday, the city of Côte-St-Luc planned a town hall meeting to answer the public’s questions about the project.

“The Cavendish extension is closer to reality now than ever before,” Côte-St-Luc city councillor Mike Cohen told the Montreal Gazette on Monday. “Once the city (of Montreal gets) that land, the extension will happen sooner than people think. It won’t be a pipe dream anymore.”

Cohen said progress has been made since Coderre announced his intention to go ahead with the project during the last election.

The city has been negotiating with the CN and CP railway companies to build overpasses over the tracks built along the proposed route. Cohen said those negotiations are going well, and he pointed out that the agglomeration council recently set aside $220,000 to conduct a feasibility of the extension.

Proposed for several decades by the Town of Mount Royal, the city of Montreal, and St-Laurent, the extension was held up because the city of Côte-St-Luc didn’t want to give access to thousands of cars to use it as an alternative to the Décarie Expressway.

However, more recent councils have seen the merit in extending the urban boulevard. In 2004, Robert Libman, who was then mayor of a merged Côte-St-Luc, got behind a project by the city to build an indirect link. It would have both ends of Cavendish extended to Royalmount Ave. on the border of Town of Mount Royal and Montreal. Cars would be diverted to the east-west Royalmount to continue their path north or south.

Cohen said Côte-St-Luc now sees an extended Cavendish as an essential link to the road network. It would allow residents to better access the central and western parts of the island, bring them closer to Namur métro station, and serve as a much-needed evacuation route for Côte-St-Luc, which is bordered by train tracks.

Montreal sees Cavendish as a gateway to economic development, as the new access road would be a boon for a $1.7-billion mega mall that developer Carbonleo hopes to build in T.M.R., near the Décarie Circle.

But there is still political opposition to the project. Jeremy Searle, the independent councillor for the Loyola district has said the project would add congestion, and essentially turn Cavendish into a highway.

Peter McQueen, the Project Montréal councillor for the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce sector, said he also fears congestion, but added the route could harm the local economy by diluting traffic from commercial arteries like Monkland Ave. and Queen Mary Rd.

He said the city should also try to add housing without adding cars.

“The need for Cavendish shows the fact the city wants to plan a fairly suburban-type development, similar to Bois-Franc in St-Laurent,” he said, adding that the project should be more oriented towards transit to the métro.

Rotrand countered that the Cavendish extension will reduce the number of cars using through traffic on the streets of Snowdon, because people from Côte-St-Luc, Hampstead and Notre-Dame-de-Grâce now drive through that neighbourhood to get to Décarie. He said the city can control for speed and congestion, by banning cars, or installing traffic lights, stop signs or other traffic-calming measures.

jmagder@postmedia.com

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Not ruling out law on riding change criteria: Couillard

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Not ruling out law on riding change criteria: Couillard

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard spoke Friday to a full audience of the Côte St. Luc Men’s Club at that city’s Aquatic and Community Centre.

The Premier spoke and answered questions about various issues, including health care, court case delays and seniors issues. He was also asked about the planned provincial riding changes for the next election, including the elimination of the Mont Royal riding as part of a merger with the Outremont riding, and the expansion of the D’Arcy McGee riding eastward.

Local politicians and activists have argued these changes violate the Election Commission’s own guidelines that ridings’ “natural communities” should be respected. Local ethnic communities say they will be split between ridings.

A citizens committee, chaired by Suburban editor-in-chief Beryl Wajsman and former NDG-Lachine MP Marlene Jennings, has hired constitutional lawyer Julius Grey to handle the legal case. Wajsman has been spearheading the fundraising effort for the legal case having raised over $6,000 in crowd funding. He took the opportunity to inform the Premier that the legal challenge will be filed in court before the end of the month.

Couillard told the gathering that the riding issue is not restricted to Montreal, but also affects the Mauricie where two ridings are also set to merge.

“People are not very happy there — it’s not related to language, it’s related to representation [in that area] on a very large territory,” the Premier said.

Couillard explained that it was decided years ago to enable the independent, non-partisan Quebec Electoral Commission to decide on riding changes “to remove petty politics and partisanship from the issue.

“The only way for us to act on [riding changes considered to be unjust] is to change the criteria on which the commission bases itself to make decisions, and for this we need to change electoral law.

“I’m not ruling this out. We’re going to have significant discussions. I know legal recourse has been tabled by the community here on this, and people should exercise their rights. That’s something that should be done.”

Couillard said he is concerned about representation by number.

“On the island of Montreal, the issue is numbers, because you say ‘why is our vote less important, apparently at least than in other parts of Quebec with a smaller population?’”

The Premier said he is also worried about the quality of representation, in relation to the rural ridings, because of their massive size distance-wise.

“We have MNAs who have to literally drive for full days and they don’t even see the whole of their community.”

Numerous dignitaries attended Friday’s speech. Couillard was introduced by D’Arcy McGee MNA David Birnbaum and thanked by Côte St. Luc mayor Mitchell Brownstein, and other attendees included Israeli Consul-General Ziv Nevo Kulman, Mount Royal MP Anthony Housefather and his chief of staff Bonnie Feigenbaum, Hampstead Mayor William Steinberg, and other MNAs — including Mont Royal’s Pierre Arcand — and Côte St. Luc council members, amongst many others.

Exploring CSL history, from farmland to a modern suburb

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Jane’s Walk is a series of free neighbourhood walking tours that helps put people in touch with their environment and with each other, by bridging social and geographic gaps and creating a space for cities to discover themselves. Since its inception in 2007, Jane’s Walk has happened in cities across North America, and is growing internationally.
Jane’s Walk honours the legacy and ideas of urban activist and writer Jane Jacobs who championed the interests of local residents and pedestrians over a car-centred approach to planning. Jane’s Walk helps knit people together into a strong and resourceful community, instilling belonging and encouraging civic leadership.

Mayor Mitchell Brownstein with residents Ricky and Marla Zipper display photo of the former Cote Saint-Luc City Hall on Westminster Ave

 

This year’s Cote Saint-Luc Jane’s Walk was organized in conjunction with the CSL Historical Society and lead by environmental activist and City Councillor Dida Berku and Director of Library Services, Janine West. It took place on the first Sunday in May.
Despite unseasonably cold temperatures and intermittent rain the pair ran an informative and fascinating history lesson as the group walked the several historic blocks down Old Cote Saint-Luc Road from Westminster to the west.

Councillor Dida Berku, Library Director Janine West and resident Michael Dennis in Prudhomme Park (May 2017)

Prudhomme Park was a very appropriate the starting point where Berku and West began recounting the story of Cote Saint-Luc, much of it touching upon the Prudhomme family, going back to the founding of the Ville Marie and the original colonization of Montreal and areas to the west, now known as the City of Cote Saint-Luc. The land was all forested and good for hunting.
Along came Paul de Chomedey, sieur de Maisonneuve, in 1642 with Jacques Cartier, bringing with them many settlers. The colony required food and de Maisonneuve granted land in the western areas of the settlement to farm and support the settlers.
Around this time, Jean Décarie was rewarded for services to the colony and the earliest grant of land was given to him in this area. The first settlers came to the Cote Saint-Luc area and set up seignueries. These were very successful farms with extremely fertile land.

Farm in Cote Saint-Luc

Prudhomme, Décarie and Lemieux, the landowners under the seigneurial system also became the early political activists as representatives of local government.
Cote Saint-Luc was much larger then, including all the land north of Cote Saint-Luc Road, encompassing all of Hampstead all the way up to Ville Saint-Laurent and continuing past the current area of Décarie and extending toward what is now Westmount.
There were three major farms in CSL back in 1750, all belonging to the Lemieux, Prudhomme and Décarie families. The land was well irrigated by the Little Saint Pierre River that now flows beneath the City of Cote Saint-Luc. The farmers used this river to transport grain to market in the heart of Old Montreal, at the Bonsecour Market. The river actually runs all the way to, and under, Pointe a Calliere museum. Beginning this year, 100 metres of the river will be exposed and viewable flowing in the basement of the museum in Old Montreal.

Chapelle Cote Saint-Luc (1899) once stood on the site of the current Saint-Patrick Square on King Edward Avenue at Cote Saint-Luc Road.

 

The Sulpicians began moving west and established a church, The Cote Saint-Luc Chapel, at the corner of present day King Edward Avenue and Cote Saint-Luc Road. This is the site of present Day Saint Patrick’s Square seniors residence.

Cette chapelle fut érigée dans la première moitié du XIXe siècle en plein cœur d’un secteur rural, le long du chemin de la Côte-St-Luc. Son emplacement exact correspond aujourd’hui au terrain situé à l’angle nord-est du chemin de la Côte-Saint-Luc et de l’avenue King Edward. Ce secteur, aujourd’hui densément peuplé, fut ouvert à la colonisation dès le début du XVIIIe siècle et conserva une vocation agricole jusqu’au début des années 1940.

 

 

CSL resident, Mike Dennis, grew up in the Prudomme Park area and he shared stories told to him by his father who was neighbours with one of the Prudhomme descendants, the grandson of of Mayor Luc Prudhomme.
Mike’s father was a photographer for the city in the 60s, 70s and 80s and he owned the land where the Old Cote Saint-Luc City Hall was eventually built on the corner of Cote Saint-Luc Rd. and Westminster Avenue, following its location at 8100 Cote Saint-Luc Rd. This building was first a school where Michael attended in his early elementary years. Eventually, he transferred to a modern public school built on Parkhaven, now owned by Ecole Maimonides.

CSL resident Michael Dennis displays old photos of the former City Hall

The Westminster Avenue structure eventually became unstable. Large support beams held the corners of the building steady in its final years. The city began to construct the present day City Hall on Cavendish Blvd. in the early 80s.
Berku explained that there were three major influences on the creation of Cote Saint-Luc: The Little Saint Pierre River, the Sulpicians and the Canadian Pacific Rail.
So, how did Cote Saint-Luc became a town in 1903? In the 1800s there were 209 people in the village, more than in NDG. By 1845 the people of Cote Saint-Luc asked for their own chapel and built a parish. In 1903 the church was organizing all civic matters. The people petitioned the government as an early demerger movement to succeed from NDG.
Pierre Lemieux, François Xavier and Jeremie Prudhomme asked for a special law from the National Assembly to create a new municipality which was granted by the government in 1903.

Cote Saint-Luc’s first mayor, Luc Prudhomme

Luc Prudhomme was nominated by Pierre Lemieux and Jeremie Prudhomme to serve as the first mayor of the village of Cote Saint-Luc.

8100 Cote Saint-Luc Road through the years: Home of CSL’s first mayor, Luc Prud’homme, Police Station, Fire Station, Recreation Department, Senior Men’s Club, Emergency Measures Organization, Emergency Medical Services, Public Security Department, Public Safety headquarters

 

The next stop on the tour was 8100 CSL Road. Built in 1927, 8100 was the home of second mayor and first city hall. Before this, city meetings were held in the church.
This building became the Health Department and Recreation Department. I recall as a youngster attending arts and crafts classes on the upper floor where the doorway was decorated with colourful beads, popular in 60s, peace-loving, hippy days.

Present day 8100 CSL Rd. houses the CSL Public Safety Department (AJM Photography)

Luc Prudhomme was the descendant of early brewers and a militia commander. The family owned over half of the land from Westmount to the western end of Montreal. Another Prudhomme relative became mayor of NDG in mid 1800s. The family was very successful and these three families intermarried and retained power for a very long time. Many of their family served on council Cote Saint-Luc for the first half of 20th century.

Jane’s Walk participants on the steps of 8100 Cote Saint-Luc Road (May 2017)

“Despite the rain, we were very pleased to see the turnout of over 25 people from near and far,” said Councillor Berku. “This first walking tour is chapter one in the history of CSL that has yet to be written,” she said.
Some highlights from the Berku-West tour:
  • Research uncovered that Cote Saint-Luc is as old  as Ville Marie. The familiar names of the original farming families like Prudhomme, Decarie and Lemieux trace back their ancestry as far back as 1642.
  • Cote Saint-Luc, and other west-end towns, like Montreal West and Westmount seceded from Montreal around 100 yrs ago in what was then the first demerger movement.
  • The three major factors in the initial establishment of the village of Cote Saint-Luc community was the Sulpician  church, the Little Saint Pierre River and the Canadian Pacific Railyards.

Councillor Dida Berku and Janine West address the crowd and show archival maps of the city in front of historic 8100 Cote saint-Luc Road (May 2017)

 

 Thanks go out to Councillor Dida Berku and Director Janine West, and to the volunteers in the fledgling Cote Saint-Luc Historical Society that I launched a few months ago. We plan to make much more information accessible to all about the place we call home.

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