Naloxone training coming to CSL First Responders

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Cote Saint-Luc EMS

With the opioide overdose crisis sweeping across Canada it was only a matter of time before widespread training of First Responders would take place. Montreal has announced its firefighters have started to receive this training. This leaves the question about Cote Saint-Luc, the only jurisdiction on the Island of Montreal with its own First Responder Service. Montreal firefighters do not respond to medical emergencies in Cote Saint-Luc.

I reached out to find out about CSL Emergency Medical Services training. Public Safety Councillor Oren Sebag confirms that CSL First Responders will indeed be trained to administer Naloxone in the case of opioide overdose.

Read More:

MONTREAL FIRST RESPONDERS TO BE TRAINED IN USE OF NALOXONE AS ‘ADDITIONAL TOOL’

“The real first responders are the people that make the call,” explains Richard Davy, a student of Social Work at McGill University. “When we consider how quickly someone can lose brain function without oxygen, these are the people that still need to be trained on how to use naloxone.”
Global
https://globalnews.ca/news/5388323/montreal-first-responders-naloxone/

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West Enders react to CSL Road pothole case

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Many west end residents have been reacting angrily to the recent Suburban report that Quebec Small Claims Court found Montreal at “gross fault” for not dealing with a large pothole on bumpy Côte St. Luc Road near Grand Boulevard in 2017.

CSL resident Eric Choueke was recently awarded $697 plus additional costs for damage to the car he was driving when he hit the pothole. The court found that Montreal was negligent in not dealing with the pothole or warning drivers about it.

Former CSL councillor Glenn Nashen weighed in on his Facebook page, and his posting received numerous responses.

“The sustained negligence of the City of Montreal on this horrible stretch of roadway is a glaring example of incompetence and indifference at every level,” Nashen wrote.

Others were of like mind.

“Every time I’m forced to drive on this miserable stretch of Côte St Luc Road, I really fear for my life and the stability of my car,” wrote Ronnie Roter. “When will we take charge of fixing this?”

Nashen responded that the “we” is the City of Montreal.

“Despite outcries from suburban mayors and residents, not much has been done,” he added. “Residents who continue to point fingers at suburban councils should get down to Montreal City Hall Council meetings and raise the issue there.”

Alisa Clamen wrote that her daughter “blew a tire and a rim on the same stretch. I had to pay to replace both — it was not pleasant.”

Harvey Levine wrote that his office is on Côte St. Luc Road “and since 2017 I have blown two tires and bent two rims. There is absolutely no reasonable excuse for this main road to be in such horrid condition. I pray that there will not be a horrible accident due to drivers constantly swerving to avoid the craters rather than paying attention to other cars, bikes, etc.”

Ruby Deen called the situation “absolutely disgraceful.

“It’s been like this for a very long time! Wake up … City of Montreal and take responsibility!”

Louise Ferland wrote that she “busted a tire and lost a hub cap on the Decarie south underpass between Jean Talon and Vézina on Super Bowl Sunday evening. I filed a complaint and claim with the CDN-NDG borough, and received a letter back that they are not responsible for my damages.

“The road there was just like Côte St. Luc Road.”

Nashen responded that Ferland should take her case to Small Claims Court and cite negligence, as Choueke did in his own case.

CSL council regular Sidney Margles suggested that CSL, CDN-NDG, Hampstead and Montreal West residents get together to demand a solution.

“Let’s invite [CDN-NDG Mayor] Sue Montgomery and [Montreal Mayor] Valerie Plante for a drive.”

Nashen pointed out that CSL Road is to be resurfaced this year, but Margles responded that this is a “stop-gap measure.

“That road needs reconstruction.”

joel@thesuburban.com

New principal takes over JPPS, for one day only

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As the school year draws to a close, JPPS elementary school in Cote Saint-Luc found an innovative way to keep spirits and excitement levels at a peak. Beloved Principal Marnie Stein released the reigns for just one day to make room for Grade 4 student Jeremy Nashen to become Principal-for-a-Day.

“Jeremy has a busy day planned,” Stein told us early in the morning. “There are meetings with the Vice-Principal and other members of staff and of course the daily announcements over the PA system.”

Principal Nashen was well-prepared for his day long gig: He amassed agenda items to review with school leadership including suggestions about student council, recess and field trips.

Principals Marnie Stein and Jeremy Nashen

Jeremy showed up early at school in order to welcome students and their parents at drop-off. Dressed in a smart, professorial-looking dark suit and bright-coloured bow tie and carrying his executive red briefcase, Jeremy made his way to the Principal’s office as his schoolmates headed to their classrooms.

After a quick briefing session he was off to the recording booth with Grade 6 students Milo and Isaac to make the morning announcements which began with the joke of the day, supplied by Charlotte in Grade 3: How do bears walk around? With bear feet!

Jeremy advocates for students at the management table

Next he sent off the kindergarten and Grade 2 students on a field trip to the Cosmodome. “You represent our school, so please be on your best behaviour and make us proud,” Jeremy told the kids before departure. He gave them a list of questions about space and astronauts and challenged them to find the answers.

Presenting the Word of the Week to the entire school

He also sent off the Grade 5 class, with their grandparents, on a trip to Old Jewish Montreal. He also reminded these older kids their behaviour should reflect JPPS’ good reputation.

Principal Jeremy supervised the recesses and lunch and even sent one student “to the bench” for a short time out.

He attended two important meetings. At the Weekly Administration Meeting he learned about grants and was able to offer some suggestions of his own. Addressing the school management staff he implored them to install tether-ball in the playground for added fun during recess. On a more serious note he requested that all grades get to have representation and vote for student council, not just the Grade 6 students (that’s my boy!).

Enjoying a coffee break (errr chocolate milk) in the Principal’s Office

JPPS-Bialik President Lee Wise expressed his overall satisfaction with the new principal’s performance today. “Our board of directors sets very high standards and we are so pleased that Jeremy exceeded all of our expectations,” Wise wisely said. “With his leadership around the management table and his commanding voice on the intercom, Jeremy has shown that our elementary school, an International Baccalaureate institution, is the place to be for fast-tracking one’s career and achieving one’s dreams.”

Checking over the school’s invoices and signing off on the expenses

The day ended like all others with Principal Nashen being picked up by his proud mom, Dr. Judy Hagshi. Once at home, the suit came off and the sweats went on: time for a granola bar and some relaxation.

Thank you to the innovative and affable Marnie Stein and the entire team at JPPS for seeking new and fun ways to keep their students motivated and inspired and always learning.

Toronto cop weighs in on “armed police for hire” debate

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Toronto cop weighs in on armed police for hire debate
Toronto police sergeant Lawrence Sager, Facebook

Toronto police sergeant Lawrence Sager weighed in regarding a Suburban report that Hampstead is pressing for local Montreal Torah Centre congregants to be able to hire armed off-duty SPVM police officers to provide security.

“Police Paid Duties have always been an extremely effective way to provide security to an event,” Sgt. Sager wrote on Facebook this past weekend. “Few would try and cause trouble with highly visible uniformed police officers present. The only pitfall is the cost.”

As we reported, Hampstead councillor Harvey Shaffer was told by the SPVM that the MTC congregants would not be allowed to hire officers. The SPVM declined to comment to The Suburban, when asked the reason for the refusal. Mayor William Steinberg is working on the matter as well, in light of recent shootings in synagogues in the U.S. and religious institutions around the world.

Sgt. Sager posted as part of a Facebook discussion on our article initiated by former Côte St. Luc councillor Glenn Nashen.

“Toronto Police have done paid duties at synagogues for many decades, as well as funerals and many other large private events,” the sergeant, who attended Wagar High School in Côte St. Luc, explained. “The paid duty office determines the number of officers required, depending on the venue and can also provide cruisers for funeral escorts.

“The drawback is that paid duty officers are quite expensive,” he added. “You get what you pay for. A police officer is armed, well trained, has other use of force options and is equipped with a police radio, in touch with the police dispatcher, capable of calling for immediate police backup without delay. We actually have difficulty filling all the paid duty requests due to manpower shortages.”

Nashen responded to Sager by saying that paid armed off-duty officers “would be a viable option in Montreal for those that can afford it. Unfortunately, the cost couldn’t be sustained by community organizations already struggling.”

Sgt. Sager further wrote that he does not know why Montreal police have not provided the service, “but I suspect it has to do with the Quebec Police Act.

“In Ontario, it’s called the Ontario Police Service Act and every province has its own laws governing what their police can do,” he wrote. “Toronto Police do paid duties in order to bolster our numbers rather than using on-duty officers and it’s allowed in Ontario.

Sgt. Sager also pointed out that the Toronto police’s 32 Division “has the largest Jewish community in Toronto with many synagogues.

“During the High Holidays, there were so many paid duties that they filled its own binder. Once no more could be given out because we ran out of officers to do them, they were offered to the rest of the service outside our division. …. Despite the high cost, there’s no shortage of requests and in many cases insurance companies require that paid duty officers be hired.

joel@thesuburban.com

New director takes control at CSL Public Safety

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Philip Chateauvert

Philip Chateauvert is assuming command of the Cote Saint-Luc Public Safety Department. Public Safety includes five divisions of professional staff and volunteers: Public Security, Emergency Communications (Dispatch), Emergency Medical Services, volunteer Citizens on Patrol and Emergency Preparedness.

Chateauvert spent the last five years as manager of Public Safety. He takes over from Jordy Reichson who recently moved on after a 10 year run as Public Safety Director. Reichson was an energetic and creative leader in this field with a passion for matters of community and personal safety. He has taken on the responsibility of managing the security of all City of Montreal buildings and facilities.

Chateauvert has distinguished himself as an affable colleague of staff and volunteers. He is also very interested in teaching which he continues to do in the field of security management at two CEGEPs, La Cité collégial Ottawa and Gerald Godin in the West Island.

He also directed medical operations in various major events such as the Thriatlon International de Montréal and the Montreal Marathon.

Previously, Chateauvert had five years of experience as a security manager in various organizations such as the Port of Montreal, the École de Technologie Supérieure and the Société de la Place des Arts. Before that he was a firefighter.

I was fortunate to serve as City Councillor responsible for Public Safety from Chateauvert’s beginning in Cote Saint-Luc. He was an excellent addition to the city’s ranks who gained the respect and appreciation of his crews.

Philip Chateauvert

I recently asked Chateauvert what inspires him most about his job?

“Undoubtedly, to have the opportunity to have an even greater impact on our ability to help the community by making it safer,” he said. “Very few managers can say that as part of their work they have the opportunity to put in place policies and procedures that can save lives,” Chateauvert added proudly. “This is my greatest motivation.”

And what are Chateauvert’s highs and lows?

“Anytime I feel like I made a difference in someone else’s life is a great day for me. Lucky enough, this happens quite often in our line of work,” he said.

“However, facing the death and grief of our patients’ families is certainly the most difficult part to see,” said Chateauvert.

And what plans does Chateauvert have as he assumes control as director?

” I plan to continue to give my 110% to find ways to prevent even more crimes, save more lives and make Cote Saint-Luc an even safer place!”

I wish much luck and success to Director Philip Chateauvert.

National Assembly again urges merchants to drop use of “Bonjour-Hi” | Montreal Gazette

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Montreal Gazette, June 7, 2019 – I have great respect for my MNA, David Birnbaum, and I believe he is doing an excellent job in representing our riding. However, we differ in approach on this thorny subject.

In responding to Birnbaum’s explanation for his cautious support of the non-binding resolution in the National Assembly today, posted to Facebook, I wrote:  

To be Inclusive, forward-looking and positive? Sure. To respect promote and master the French language? Absolutely. To interfere with private conversation between private business and private citizens? Not the role of our parliamentarians. As you rightly point out, French is as healthy as ever in Montreal. No need to suppress the English language.

vCOP celebrates Bar Mitzvah

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Enough cake to feed nearly 100 volunteers

It wasn’t your ordinary Bar Mitzvah celebration but vCOPs by the dozens showed up to celebrate the 13th birthday of their community-minded organization, Cote Saint-Luc’s volunteer Citizens on Patrol.

From a handful of volunteers, a single patrol vehicle and a lot of spirit and dedication the group has grown tremendously over the years since I launched it back on July 1, 2006. (Search vCOP in this blog for the history and photos).

Susie and Harvey Schwartz were among the first 10 volunteers to sign up. They’ve since patrolled thousands of kilometers along the streets of Cote Saint-Luc.

Today, nearly 100 volunteers routinely don their orange polo tops and bright yellow jackets and patrol our city in four marked vehicles as well as on electric scooters, bikes and on foot patrol.

Mayor Brownstein and his wife Elaine joined me at the vCOP celebration to cheer on our amazing volunteers

vCOP is a one of a kind organization. There’s nothing like it throughout Quebec. Well structured, highly organized, discipline and training throughout the ranks, the group is a shining example of what hard work, dedication and determination of a corps of supervisors and patrollers can do in augmenting the safety of an entire community.

Dedicated supervisors and patrollers flank the mayor and councillor responsible for public safety, Oren Sebag

The event, a barbecue to celebrate the summer season (despite the cold air!), was held in the Lawrence Bergman Chalet of Trudeau Park. Several councillors dropped by as well as a sizable corps of police officers from Neighbourhood Station 9 and volunteers from Cote Saint-Luc Emergency Medical Services. There were public security officers on hand as well as the management team of Philip Chateauvert and Jean-Marc Dubois in addition to former director Jordy Reichson.

L-R: Supv. David Goldsmith, Fmr. Dir. Jordy Reichson, Susie Schwartz, Chief Philip Chateauvert, Supv. Elaine Meunier, Mgr. Jean-Marc Dubois, Fmr. Cllr & vCOP Founder Glenn J. Nashen, Supv. Phil Mayman, Supv. Mitchell Herf

When you see the vCOP patrols ride by give them a thumbs up and offer a word of thanks. If you see them stopping in for a coffee at McDonald’s why not pay it forward and pick up their snack tab. They will appreciate the gesture and you’ll feel great doing so.

Thank you to all of our vCOP crews. You are wonderful volunteers who deserve much appreciation. Here’s to another great 13 years together!

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